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421 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Kathy Luque
    Sep 28, 2010 @ 14:34:21

    I have a question: what type of tree would you recommend for a peanut island that doesn’t grow too big or send up babies like an aspen.I also don’t want pods to rake up.This is near the front of my house.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 30, 2010 @ 16:18:10

      Hey, Kathy!
      Hmmm. How big is not too big? Like 12-15 feet? There are some lovely small crabapple trees in the 8-10 foot range that hold on to their pretty little (1/2 inch) crabapples through the winter so there is no mess. Also some evergreens, mostly pines, that come in dwarf sizes although that may be 15-20 feet tall. Or maybe a native maple, Acer ginnala, that is in the 15 foot range.

      Reply

      • Lisa
        Apr 18, 2011 @ 16:52:27

        Where can we buy the crabapple you described? Is there a specific name?

        Reply

        • Joy
          May 02, 2011 @ 16:41:51

          You can find the tree at Wasatch Shadows Nursery, I believe it is called Crimson Pointe from Monrovia.

          Reply

    • steve
      Nov 01, 2012 @ 14:21:06

      joy i was wondering what is a good place to get mulsch in provo or orem that is affordable it is my first house.

      thank you

      steve

      Reply

      • Davud
        Nov 11, 2013 @ 11:05:20

        Often times sewer districts will sell compost and wood chips for $10-$30 a pick up load. I would try contacting Orem City Public Works for more information.

        Reply

        • Joy
          Nov 11, 2013 @ 12:11:24

          In Salt Lake, the treatment plant on about 3200 S and 7th west has some very, very good compost for sale. I’ve used it and taken a tour to see the processes they use. The Product is Oquirrh Mountain.

          Reply

  2. Jana
    Oct 05, 2010 @ 13:41:53

    Hi Joy,

    I have a Maple type tree that has small white bumps on it that appear to be like spider web. Is this spider mites? Can I do something to get rid of them without killing my tree?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 06, 2010 @ 08:08:49

      Hi Jana,
      If you put a white piece of paper under the leaves and flick the leaves to knock off the dust and the dust starts to move around, you probably have Spider Mites. Soapy water sprayed on them should do the trick. But if that test seems negative, see if you can wipe them off with a damp cloth. At the end of this season, rake up all the leaves and put them in the trash instead of composting them, just in case there is something really bad going on here.
      Let me know what happens when you try the ‘tests’.
      Happy Growing!

      Reply

  3. Dana
    Oct 06, 2010 @ 14:14:34

    how do i harvest dianju pears? i pick them in november and they just srival up.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 13, 2010 @ 11:19:22

      Anjou pears usually store very well if they are ripe and haven’t frozen. Cut one open now and see if the seeds are hard and dark brown. They don’t change color so that isn’t a way to determine ripeness. When the seeds indicate ripeness, pick them all. D’Anjou can usually be stored in a cool, dry area for up to two months.
      They can be stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks before eating.

      Reply

      • Dana
        Oct 19, 2010 @ 15:28:15

        Thank you so much. i picked them and they are amazing. forgive me for being stupid, but you call them anjou pears. the tag on the tree says D’Anjou pear dwarf #7 And the tree which is supposed to be a dwarf is now 30 feet tall. please educate me whats happened.

        Reply

        • Joy
          Oct 19, 2010 @ 15:41:37

          D’Anjou or Anjou, depends on the french-ness of the name but it’s the same pear. Sounds like the dwarfing rootstock was overtaken by the regular pear tree that was grafted to it. You now have a standard pear tree!! Might have been a labeling mistake before you bought it, but there’s not to do about it now except enjoy the numerous pears.

          Reply

          • Marlene
            Jul 19, 2011 @ 10:10:18

            Joy, I love listening to your program. I was picking my red raspberries this morning and they have earwigs. Can you tell me what to do to get rid of the earwigs?
            Thanks

          • Joy
            Jul 24, 2011 @ 08:32:51

            Try Sluggo-Plus, I believe it is registered for use around edible crops. Earwigs are everywhere this year, the moisture made everyplace a good nesting area for them. And, since it’s so difficult to get rid of them all, remember to put the raspberries in a strainer or colander and submerge the strainer in a large pan or sink of water. Those little beggars will come floating to the top rather quickly.

  4. Steve Verhoeven
    Oct 08, 2010 @ 13:52:14

    What do I need to do to get Rhonda Lee’s Fried Green Tomato recipe? Thanks for all the info you teach us about God’s great outdoors!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 09, 2010 @ 17:18:14

      Hi Steve,
      I’ve been sending copies if folks send in a S.A.S.E. but I hope to figure out how to scan in the recipes and then I can send them via email and you can print out your own copies.
      Should I succeed you will get them soon. If not……well, plan B will go into effect.

      Reply

  5. Glenna Lasater
    Oct 09, 2010 @ 10:04:38

    Joy,

    I planted three Clehms Bectal Crabapple trees in my park strip about 8 or 9 years ago. After growing and thriving, two of them completely died 2 years ago. Now the third looks like the bark is sick.

    What can I do to determine the problem and save the last one?

    Glenna

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 09, 2010 @ 17:15:59

      Hi Glenna,
      Did the ones that died show any signs of chlorosis? Yellowing of the leaves with darker veins? Did the way or amount of watering change? What kind of soil are they growing in? Is there grass in the park strip also? Whew! Not quite 20 questions….but it may give us a place to start.

      Reply

      • Glenna Lasater
        Sep 24, 2012 @ 16:35:45

        Joy,

        The soil is rocky and hard. The watering did not change. I don’t remember if the leaves changed colors first. Does that help narrow it down?

        Glenna

        Reply

        • Joy
          Oct 05, 2012 @ 10:07:26

          I fear it was the combination of two terrible years….the damage shows up sometimes much later. This last winter may have just been the last great stressor. The best thing you could this year is make sure the soil is well watered going into winter i.e. late November.

          Reply

  6. Jennifer Strong
    Oct 10, 2010 @ 21:04:20

    I am preparing to transplate my iris. I have a white vinyl fence on the north side of my yard, and nothing seems to thrive there because it gets so hot. My iris seem pretty hardy, would they do okay there? I planted tomatoes there this year, and all they could do was not die. The plants didn’t even grow. I eventually transplated them. I am also going to transplant my rasberries, would they do okay against the vinyl? Are there any plants that would thrive there and not die? Could I grow corn there next year?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 13, 2010 @ 10:58:23

      Iris will probably make it just fine. If you are going to try veggies again next year, this fall dig in 3-4 inches of good compost and enlarge your bed to 3 feet wide, if it is more narrow than that, and put the plants 12-18 inches from the fence. Peppers and eggplants, melons and winter squash usually thrive with that much sun and heat. Corn would survive as long as you water very often….like every day when it get hot plus add fertilizer every 3 weeks.
      Raspberries will curl up their toes and think you sent them to hel…..hades. If you had a fence on the west side so the berries would get morning sun and afternoon shade they would be happy….maybe even think they went to Bear Lake for the summer!

      Reply

  7. Julina Hall
    Oct 12, 2010 @ 09:52:24

    Have a question: What do I do right now to prepare my square foot garden beds for winter? We have just about harvested all our plants from them, so they will only be full of soil. How can I enrich the soil and protect it from weeds and winter drying?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 13, 2010 @ 10:40:35

      Lots and lots of good compost should be dug in clear to the bottom of the box. Try Miller’s Box Mix or Harvest Supreme Compost. next, cover with 2-4 inches of leaves and then put something like Poultry Netting (chicken wire) over the top to keep the leaves from blowing away. If you can run the lawnmower over the leaves first to make itty bitty pieces it would even be better.

      Reply

  8. Judy Guymon
    Oct 16, 2010 @ 21:33:07

    I would like the recipe you mentioned on the air for Green Tomato Bread. I couldn’t find it anywhere on your website.
    Thank you, Judy

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 19, 2010 @ 17:03:16

      It’s now on my home page. You can find the other Green Tomato recipes on my KNRS page: KNRS.com Keyword: Joy then click on recipes.

      Reply

  9. Pete Mazinov
    Oct 19, 2010 @ 11:28:20

    Hi. Any recommendations for bulk compost, delivered? It would be for a large vegetable garden, so I’d prefer something that doesn’t come from a landfill or waste treatment plant. Thanks.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 19, 2010 @ 15:35:04

      Hi Pete,
      Try Replenish Landscape Garden Supply; Wasatch Nursery; IFA Country Store in Riverton. Oh – do you live in the Salt Lake valley?

      Reply

  10. Kathy Gifford
    Oct 21, 2010 @ 11:24:18

    Hi Joy, I have been battling powdery mildew all summer in different places.
    Now my roses are covered, and I treated them twice. Do I try to treat them now again or just wait until next spring and start again? Thanks for all your great advice.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 21, 2010 @ 11:38:44

      Just wait. Once the fungus is on/in the leaves there is nothing you can do. This cold, wet spring made Powdery Mildew worse on nearly everything. Only a preventative can keep the stuff away – the spores are always around. New leaves need to be treated before the gray patches show up. Our book Joy in Your Garden has several non-chemical treatments for keeping Powdery Mildew in check.

      Reply

  11. Lana
    Nov 02, 2010 @ 12:09:30

    Joy, Can I bring in one of those lolly pop daisey trees and have it live through the winter? Actually I have the one with the purple blossoms.
    And it cost me $50, hate to loose it….??????
    Thanks
    Lana

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 04, 2010 @ 11:52:47

      Those seductive beauties are really annuals around here. Yes, they can come inside but everyone I’ve seen ends up with a huge infestation of aphids. Give yours a good spray with soapy water, wait 10 minutes and then spray with tepid water. Remember to hit all the twigs and under sides of the leaves. Put the little tree in a bright spot and go very easy on the water. Sadly, it will probably drop its flowers and leaves but, hey, surprises are good and you may have the exception that proves this sad rule.

      Reply

  12. Jennie
    Nov 06, 2010 @ 23:02:14

    I love your show and book you inspired me to start composting this year. I started a Vermi composting system that is where I recycle my newspapers and my food scraps. If all goes well, I will have some nice compost for my flower beds next year. Thank you for all the information you give us novice gardners.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 07, 2010 @ 05:41:18

      Thanks! do you have a way to take pictures every week or two? I’d love to see the progress/results.

      Reply

      • Jennie
        Nov 08, 2010 @ 21:05:18

        Oh, I have a camera…I will take some pictures for you. That is not a problem.

        Reply

  13. John Mitchell
    Nov 07, 2010 @ 15:05:01

    I am interested in purchasing a “home visit” by you, as a gift for some relatives.
    How do I do that & how much does it cost

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 08, 2010 @ 12:50:43

      Hi John! You can purchase a Gift Certificate for $85 (one hour) and I will send the certificate to either you or directly to the recipient. They can then contact me next season and set up the consultation at their convenience. Just email (askjoy@joyinthegarden.com) and we’ll make the arrangements.

      Reply

  14. Vicki Crist
    Nov 08, 2010 @ 14:54:53

    Dear Joy,

    I work at J & L Garden Center in Bountiful, Utah. This coming year, 2011, will be Diane Ashby’s, our planting bed supervisor, 25th year working there. We would like to do something special for her and thought that perhaps you might be able to host your radio show some Saturday during the spring or summer months at J & L Garden Center! She is a wonderful boss and all customers seek her out for her knowledge and friendship. I will wait for your response.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 10, 2010 @ 07:22:07

      HI Vicki,
      I would be delighted to honor Diane, and think it would be fun to add “facts about Diane” to my regular program every Saturday during the growing season. The problem with hosting from your place is that I have no say about where the program goes. It’s a matter of one of the KNRS sales reps selling an advertising package to J&L.
      But, I could have her as a guest on the show when she hits (or is close) to her actual anniversary …..or maybe her birthday. I know how rare it is to have someone in our business stay committed to her work and customers for that long. So, as we brainstorm a little, I’m sure we can come up with a fun tribute to Diane.

      Reply

  15. Donna Drecksel
    Dec 25, 2010 @ 11:05:34

    Hi Joy! Do you have the sweet potato/apple recipe mentioned on a recent Saturday program featuring comments about Thanksgiving foods folks could not be without?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2011 @ 13:55:22

      Hi Donna, Does the black stuff rub off, looking a little like soot? The term ‘fire blister’ may be a local name for another disease.

      Reply

  16. Kellee England
    Dec 27, 2010 @ 13:22:12

    Hi Joy,
    A few years ago I went to a Relief Society Meeting where you spoke and answered questions. I really enjoyed it and you did a wonderful job. I have moved to a new ward since and was wondering if you would be willing to speak and answer questions for one of our additional Relief Society Meetings?

    Reply

  17. Ann
    Jan 06, 2011 @ 16:20:10

    Hi Joy,
    I am trying to find a plant I saw last summer in planters, my son-in-law called it a sweet potato vine, and so me it looks like a versa lime and a coleus, do you know if they are the same plant?
    Thanks!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jan 07, 2011 @ 08:05:52

      It is, indeed, called Sweet Potato Vine! There are two color choices – one is very deep purple, Blackie is one variety and the other color is a lime green. All of our local nurseries will carry both during the planting season.

      Reply

  18. Shaylene Wasden
    Mar 02, 2011 @ 13:00:26

    Hi Joy!
    I have a question. My husband and I moved into a home in central UT about two years ago that has about 25 producing apple trees and one pear tree. The house was vacant for I don’t know how many years before we moved in so the trees haven’t been given a lot of recent care. The first summer here, every tree had a mass production of fruit, but last year we didn’t get ANYTHING. We tried pruning them down and spraying them with fruit tree spray just like the year before, but to no avail. Being new orchard bosses with no prior experiance, we would like to know about proper pruning techniques and if it’s too late to prune now. Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 02, 2011 @ 15:39:34

      Hi Shaylene! The apple trees are behaving just as would be expected: apple trees that are let go hog wild with fruit production most often skip a year before producing again. There is a suppression of flower buds when a tree is busy trying to ripen all that fruit. Now is the time of year to prune apple trees but be cautious and remove no more than 20% of the ‘canopy’ or leaf cover. Heavy pruning not only keeps the every other year type production going, but also promotes tons of water sprouts. These sprouts start usually in June; springing right out of the sides or tops of branches; grow straight up; and, do not produce apples. Although pruning is done late winter/early spring, water sprouts are best dealt with in June. When caught early, you can use ‘thumb pruning.’ That is, put on tough gloves and just rub off the extra sprouts. If left to grow a year, you need pruners and if they grow a couple of years or more you will need to use heavy loppers or maybe even a saw.

      Reply

  19. Linda Anderson
    Mar 08, 2011 @ 10:31:15

    I have 2 questions. I am putting in raised garden boxes. Four – 4X8 boxes made from redwood. (is this a good material to use?)
    1. What BRAND of organic matter should I buy? There are so many out there!
    I need to buy bags, as my back yard is fenced and no way for dirt (other than wheel barrel) to be brought in. I want a good mix, I have used cheap dirt in the past…just doesn’t work.
    2. I want to buy a couple of fruit trees. A cherry and apricot, any suggestions where or what kind?
    I live in Utah County, but will travel any place in the valley you suggest.
    Thanks and I love your radio show.
    Linda Anderson
    Saratoga Springs

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 08, 2011 @ 11:09:03

      Hi Linda,
      Second part first:
      I saw those beds when I had a book signing – I’ve already recommended the $99 4X4 with zippered top to one of my clients! Did you already buy the redwood? I think you could use the top on any 4X4 box regardless of material and you could double up the boxes like I saw or separate them and have 2 beds. The top could be moved around as needed.

      I recommend Miller’s Box Mix. Most locally owned full service nurseries carry this brand; and, I think the IFA Country Stores do as well.

      As for fruit trees I recommend staying away from cherry trees. Peaches, apricots, plums and apples are a good choice but you will need extra effort and precautions to get them to grow where you are. Email me again when you buy and I’ll talk you through planting.
      For most homeowner purposes the semi-dwarf size are best. Elberta, especially Lemon Elberta is my favorite peach but it is really a matter of taste. Local nurseries are the best places to buy since they carry the varieties that do well here.

      Happy Growing!

      Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 01, 2011 @ 19:42:15

      1. I like Replenish, Oakdell Egg Farm Organic Compost, Black Magic, Earthworm castings, Harvest Supreme. Replenish Landscape Products will “blow” the material into your beds with a huge blower connected to their truck.
      2. Apricot: Tilton or Chinese (also known as Mormon
      Cherry: Why? They will always have worms in them. Maybe a dwarf variety that you can completely cover with something like floating row
      cover. Pie cherries seldom get worms in them. I think Sweet Cherry trees are best used for shade or Robin feeding stations.

      Reply

  20. JD Larrabee
    Mar 09, 2011 @ 09:21:32

    Hey Joy! Former student of your’s here. My wife and I bought a fixer upper in West Valley last year and have the inside feeling comfortable. I am now ready to concentrate on the yard. When I water most of the water just runs off the lawn and onto the sidewalk and what doesn’t gets sucked up by our pine tree. The yard also in direct sunlight most of the day. I can’t seem to get it green. I’m pretty sure it’s the soil. What is the best way to condition it? Do earthworms help clay soil? It was suggested that I spread used coffee grounds over the lawn, does that help?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 16, 2011 @ 15:54:19

      JD! Long time since our stab at Gifted Ed, eh? Get someone to Core Aerate your lawn and then leave the cores (yeh, I know it looks like a dog convention stopped by but the cores will gradually disappear) Try not to water until the end of April even if the lawn starts begging for water. Mow with your mower set on the highest notch. Earthworms help but also leave the lawn very bumpy – the aeration should help with that. Coffee grounds are good for the garden, but not so much for the lawn. Send me a picture, askjoy@joyinthegarden.com and we’ll go from there.
      Really wonderful to hear from you – congratulations on the house and garden (and lovely wife).

      Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 22, 2011 @ 11:17:39

      Howdy JD! If you aren’t going to rip up the lawn and start from scratch, core aeration (leave the plugs in place to break down) now plus a light application of fertilizer just before a rainstorm so you don’t need to water it in; wait until the end of April to start watering regularly and mow with your lawnmower set at the highest setting. Coffee grounds are great for the garden, not so much for the lawn.

      Reply

  21. Marie
    Mar 10, 2011 @ 09:44:05

    Hi Joy! I’m a young mother and a recent home owner. I am excited to plant a garden and beautiful flowers. But, I have NO IDEA what I’m doing. I’m wondering what you would suggest for an unexperienced, first timer. I was thinking tomatoes, zucchini and blackberries for the garden. For flowers, I love tulips. Could you give me some tips on when I should begin planting and what grows best here? I live in Utah County.

    Thanks!
    Marie

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 16, 2011 @ 15:49:14

      Welcome to the gardening adventure! I recommend you buy our book, “Joy in Your Garden” for starters.
      The garden should receive full sun all day if possible. If you can determine where you are going to put the blackberries, you can plant them as soon as you can prepare the soil. All Utah soil needs extra compost – your locally owned nurseries can help you choose some good organic matter. Your planting beds for veggies should be 4 feet wide and as long as you desire, with 3 foot paths in between. If the beds are against a fence or wall, make them just 2 feet wide. Tomatoes and Zucchini don’t go in the ground until mid May.
      Once you get your gardens planned, get back to me for more details.

      Reply

  22. Brandy
    Mar 15, 2011 @ 10:38:42

    Hi Joy,
    I live on a foothill in Springville and our neighbors have graciously offered to let us use an empty lot behind their house for some more garden space this summer. It seems fairly rocky but other than that I don’t know much about the soil. Is it worth it to plant over there or would I have to haul in some dirt/organic material to make it work?

    I have a small garden plot in our yard, but would LOVE to grow beans by the millions for canning and maybe some corn over there.

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 16, 2011 @ 15:43:22

      I recommend bringing in enough organic material, like compost, to cover the planting beds 6 inches deep. Only the beds, which can be as long as you want but only 4 feet wide with 3 foot paths between the beds. If you suspect there will be a perennial weed problem, I’d lay down a layer of overlapping wet newspaper or wet cardboard before putting down the compost. If it isn’t too rocky, you could dig/till in the first 2 inches of compost and then put down the paper/cardboard and cover with the remaining compost. When it’s time to plant, push back the compost, cut an X in the paper and plant into the lower soil, or cut a slit in the paper to plant a row of beans, for instance. As the plants grow, pull the compost back to the plants to reduce weeds and maintain soil moisture.
      You’re welcome!

      Reply

  23. Jean
    Mar 16, 2011 @ 10:50:45

    I was wondering on how to care for my lie lacks? some are so over growing the trees and some that or not growing well at all. I was told that I needed to prune them. when is the best time to prune them and how do you do it?
    thanks

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 16, 2011 @ 15:36:47

      Lilacs are best trimmed after they bloom. To bring back to a better size, cut 1 out of 4 of the oldest (largest) trunks clear to the ground. For instance, if you count 12 of biggest, oldest stems then saw down 3 of them. If the bush is too tall, cut down the center ones; if the bush is too wide, cut off the ones that grow more to the sides. Then next year remove another 2 or 3 of the huge stems and the same the next year and you will have basically a new lilac shrub!

      Reply

  24. Melissa Finlinson
    Mar 21, 2011 @ 13:23:38

    We are wanting to kill our strawberry plants this year and plant tomatoes in their place. What is the best way of doing this?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 21, 2011 @ 16:47:07

      Just pull/rake them out! No need to use anything other than vigorously applied elbow-grease! They won’t come back without a crown present.

      Reply

  25. Joni Longfellow
    Mar 21, 2011 @ 19:43:03

    How do I get ahold of you to talk about a speaking engagement in May?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 31, 2011 @ 19:51:48

      My schedule is filled until July – I usually start booking for the spring in Oct/Nov/Dec of the previous year. Contact me via email, askjoy@joyinthegarden.com for more information.

      Reply

  26. Kay Myers
    Mar 23, 2011 @ 10:29:37

    Joy

    I have a grapefruit tree in Beaver Dam AZ the limbs are black and someone told me it was fire blister? Ever heard of this? What can we do to treat it? It produces the most beautiful grapefruits and were afraid it may die. Please help, we so enjoy watching you on Good Things Utah. Thanks for you help I hope.

    Reply

  27. Robin Lambert
    Mar 23, 2011 @ 19:33:30

    Hi Joy! I’ve got a brand new house and a blank slate of a yard I am excited to fill with beautiful things (if warm weather will ever get here!). I have been eying some hydrangeas in the catalogs, but I have not had very good luck with them before. Are there any particular varieties that you have found do well here in Utah? Specifically, in rocky soil (we live in Traverse Mountain, which is nothing but rocks!) I would love to put some in a border around the house. How far away from the house should you plant flowering shrubs to give them enough room? If hydrangeas won’t work, what other flowering shrubs would you recommend?

    Reply

  28. Roy Middleton
    Mar 27, 2011 @ 11:19:14

    Joy in the Garden

    I tried to get in on your program Saturday, but I could not. I have enjoyed listening to you for a number of years now, and I love your program and your garden teachings. I have two questions.

    1. I have a nice asparagus bed that is overgrown with grass and weeds. Is it possible to kill the grass and weeds with Roundup? Or something equal to it?

    2. The City of Kaysville is putting a water line next to my property line. The trench is about 5 feet wide and 7 feet deep and will be within ten feet of my very large evergreen trees. By digging that trench and disturbing the roots of those large trees will it kill them?

    Thank you for all you do.

    Roy Middleton
    Fruit Heights, Utah
    801-546-8066 – 801 807-9366

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 31, 2011 @ 20:14:56

      Hi Roy,
      1. asparagus does not compete well with grass but most weed killers are not approved for use around the plants. If the spears are not up yet, you could check the label of glyphosate (like RoundUp) products and see if they are registered for use in the bed.
      2. my large (35 foot) Austrian pine had a similar problem, only they dug within 6 feet down both sides of the tree. That was 2 years ago and the tree looks fine right now. I just don’t know if it is living on stored resources or if it is struggling along on what roots are left or if it may just do fine in the future. Only time will give us the answer.

      Reply

  29. Susan Halter
    Mar 28, 2011 @ 10:21:37

    Hi Joy,
    My dad said that a while back you said that you had lost your roses due to something that happened in November? I went out to check mine and sure enough, dead!?
    What happened?
    Thanks Joy,
    Susan

    Reply

  30. Marilyn Mann
    Mar 29, 2011 @ 05:21:31

    We are landscaping a new home. We want to install a raised vegetable garden in the corner of a sloping yard. The bed will have three 90 degree corners and a curved front side. Cement blocks will form the front curve. We thought of using timbers on the backside of the bed; however, we have heard some controversy with chemicals leaching into vegetable gardens from some landscaping timbers. Can timbers be used for vegetable spots or should we stick with cement block for the entire bed? Please give us your recommendations for the type of material to use. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 18, 2011 @ 13:56:45

      New railroad ties have creosote and shouldn’t be used around edible crops. Several years ago companies stopped using CCA to treat timbers – CCA contained arsenic. If you have your doubts as to what has been used to treat the timbers, line the inside of the growing area with plastic stapled to the wood. That should give you the option of keeping the material the same or making the back sides a little different.

      Reply

  31. Cindy Koziar
    Mar 29, 2011 @ 12:21:07

    Dear Joy: I have a lilac shrub that for the past two years has had a problem with leaf curl. The leaves sprout normally but as they mature they shrivel and curl, but do not turn brown. I thought the problem might be powdery mildew but do not see any evidence of this on the leaves. I am trying to decide whether to pull the lilac out or leave it if this is a fixable problem. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 09, 2011 @ 13:43:38

      If your lilac is more than 7 years old, the problem could be Lilac Borer. Younger than that and it sounds suspiciously like someone in the neighborhood is spraying with a dandelion killer. Did this shrub grow and bloom normally years ago?

      Reply

      • Cindy Koziar
        Apr 10, 2011 @ 13:37:59

        Dear Joy:
        I planted the lilac shrub in 1993. It has bloomed beautifully all this time except for the last two years. During the first problem year, the leaves curled and dropped off but the flowers still bloomed nicely. Last year, the blooms were scant and not well formed; the leaves were in worse shape than the year before. I will check into Lilac Borer being the problem. Thank you for your response. Any more advice will be appreciated.
        Cindy

        Reply

  32. Kristyna
    Mar 30, 2011 @ 14:40:10

    My roses seem to have died this winter, we have about 15 bushes and thay are black. Have you had any other complants and do you know what is going on?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 31, 2011 @ 10:58:42

      Oh my, yes we have roses all over that didn’t make it through the winter, mine included. I lost 5 mini roses outright, had to cut 4 others down to about 5″. My regular roses took the same hit – lost 4 entirely and have cut others down to about 4 inches before finding live tissue in the canes.
      We can look back to the tremendously fast drop in temperature in November. None of the roses were able to naturally harden off. Now we see the results. If there is ANY live tissue above the graft, you may want to wait to see how they recover. Some you will see have died completely and this is your chance for a new variety of rose!!

      Reply

  33. Kristyna
    Mar 31, 2011 @ 09:56:54

    I have a friend in draper who is having the same problem. The established roses seem to have died.

    Reply

  34. Kristyna
    Mar 31, 2011 @ 13:36:54

    Thank you, that helps alot, now we know ware to go from here.

    Reply

  35. Lynda
    Apr 02, 2011 @ 11:11:53

    What is your phone number to call in to your radio show?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 03, 2011 @ 16:12:33

      KNRS – 888 570-8010 is the line to our radio program

      Reply

  36. Estelle
    Apr 02, 2011 @ 19:26:35

    Hi Joy,
    I bought one of you garden books at Costco the other day and I ask you what type of Apricot tree you would plant here.I forgot what you told me. Could you please give me that name again? Also I want to tell you I have the most beautiful patch of Maltese Cross flowers you have ever seen. And they have spread to other parts of my garden and are so pretty! They really do well here in Utah.
    Thanks, Joy
    Estelle Lyman

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 03, 2011 @ 16:13:04

      Either Tilton or Chinese (Mormon) apricots do very well here.

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 12:47:40

      That strange stuff is the symptom of Bacterial Wet Wood, also know as Slime Flux. It is a systemic disease with no cure. You can improve the appearance of the tree by washing off the foamy stuff with water and a bleach solution (one part bleach to nine parts water.) Then cut off the soggy bark, leaving a clean ‘wound’. Don’t cover the area with anything. Every time the foam builds up, just clean it off. It only gets in trees and rarely does anything but cosmetic damage. Oh, and attract insects of all kinds.

      Reply

  37. Lynda
    Apr 02, 2011 @ 20:09:03

    Is there a purple version of star of bethlehem flower? We have one in our yard, it only blooms in spring for a week or two, then disappears ’til the next year. It grows everywhere and blooms all at once. I have read how invasive the star of bethlehem flower is and this one in our yard certainly resembles it, but it is not white. I like that it is everywhere. We even had a bridal party stop yesterday to ask to take photos in the yard covered with the beautiful purple flowers. I have photos if it will help identify. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 03, 2011 @ 16:13:33

      Hmmm……yep, please send a photo

      Reply

      • Joy
        Apr 06, 2011 @ 21:18:02

        You can cut them now but lose the flowers for this spring. Or you can wait until the flowers fade and then cut them back to the short length.
        You’re welcome!

        Reply

  38. sue
    Apr 06, 2011 @ 09:16:32

    I listen to your Saturday morning show most weeks. I heard about the slim chance of the roses…so I’m anxiously waiting for any signs of my roses. Now a question I have been meaning to ask for a few months…but now with the recent heavy snows, I really need to ask. We have a hedge of 5′ (I think) bridal bushes that we’ve trimmed neatly. Now the snows have put holes in the tops. Can I cut them back 12-18 inches? They are starting to bud out. The leaves in the past only go a few inches deep and the rest is bare. Can I cut them back now or do I need to wait until the fall? Thank you for your help now and on your radio show. Sue Gray

    Reply

  39. Karen
    Apr 06, 2011 @ 10:29:14

    Hey Joy,

    Any suggestions for voles in the garden. We have plowed the garden and the soil is nice and soft and they are making burrows all over. In the summer time they like to eat the produce. We got rid of them when we got a cat but the cat is not doing its job apparently becuase they are back. Poison in the garden doesn’t sound good either.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 18, 2011 @ 14:13:06

      Poison is a terrible last resort but you can make it safer for critters other than the voles by placing the poison half way into a piece of 2 inch PVC pipe. Place the pipe half buried somewhere along their trails. Check with IFA (Intermountain Farmer’s Association Country Stores) for the best kind of bait to use.
      Do make sure they are Voles and not Pocket Gophers.

      Reply

  40. Stephanie
    Apr 10, 2011 @ 21:49:42

    Joy, I am so excited to start our first garden this year but my husband and I were wondering if it is safe to water our garden with secondary water (we live in Riverton). Thanks so much and we are definitely planning on getting your book. 🙂

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 18, 2011 @ 08:28:12

      Safe? Sure, but you have now joined the elite corp of WFG (weed fighting gardeners). The weeds seeds up stream from you will be coming soon to your garden. Extra measures may need to be taken to stay ahead of the invaders but you can still grow all you’d like to.

      Reply

  41. C Eckardt
    Apr 11, 2011 @ 15:23:36

    Joy,
    After a story published in Southern Living magazine a while back I have dreamed about beautiful hydrangeas in my garden. I have read conflicting articles about whether you can or can’t grow these plants in Utah. Could you give me some advice how I can best grow these beauties in our cold winter state?
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 19, 2011 @ 10:30:59

      If the hydrangeas are listed to at least zone 5, you can certainly give them a try. Success is another matter all together. They prefer humidity, acid soil, sun but filtered afternoon shade……. Try an east exposure with shade from trees or shrubs in the late afternoon; amend the soil with at least 4 inches of peat moss and a couple of inches of good compost. After planting, spread another 2 inches of potting soil with peat moss, like MiracleGro potting soil, as a mulch. Fertilize with an acidifying fertilizer at half strength every week. Good Luck!

      Reply

  42. David
    Apr 18, 2011 @ 15:08:51

    I have a big front lawn and there are some spots that don’t seem to be growing. Some are circular, but others are irregular. Do you know what causes those spots or how I could fix it so the lawn grows equally in the yard?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 10:15:03

      I fear those are the dreaded Necrotic Ring Spot signs. Keep your lawn healthy, mow long, fertilize lightly, water deeply. You can take an eight by eight piece of your turf in to your local USU Extension Office for better identification. Try to get a square of sod that has both healthy and affected blades of grass. We don’t have any effective treatments if it is that particular fungal disease.

      Reply

  43. Holly Crist
    Apr 19, 2011 @ 11:28:08

    I have a large and beautiful apple tree that gives great privacy and lots of apples that we don’t want. They really make a mess is our yard and my family hates cleaning it up. My husband wants to chop it down, but I really love it. Is there a way that you know of to reduce the amount of fruit it produces?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2011 @ 16:39:55

      Use a product called Flor-El fruit eliminator and spray when the tree is in full bloom; you must hit the blossoms for it to work. Most full service local nurseries and IFA Country Stores will carry it.

      Reply

  44. Kristi Taylor
    Apr 21, 2011 @ 13:09:05

    Hi Joy, I just wondered if your book is for zone 4 gardners?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 21, 2011 @ 15:48:19

      Karen Bastow, co-author of Joy in Your Garden, lives in zone 4 and so we were very intent on making sure our high altitude gardening friends get some help. I think you’ll find our “high on a mountain tips” are right for your garden.

      Reply

  45. Nadene Lane
    Apr 25, 2011 @ 13:35:43

    I have a question about soil. My small back yard is the perfect size for a garden. The thing is my sewer pipe broke and all the sewage leaked into the dirt in my yard. Someone said that I could still plant there, and others have said not to. What is your advice? I am hoping that I can still plant there.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 26, 2011 @ 10:04:37

      I would avoid growing edibles in that soil. Especially root crops. And
      always use gloves when working the soil. If you add 3-4 inches of compost
      at least once (twice better) a year I think above ground crops would be OK
      in a year or two.

      A raised bed garden with a layer of cardboard as a barrier would solve the problem.

      Reply

  46. Melissa
    Apr 26, 2011 @ 18:07:19

    I am starting my first garden in a couple of small 4×4 plots in my community garden here in north salt lake. I plan to do mostly vegetables as my herbs are indoor by a sunny window. But I would really like to have flowers for cutting too!!! I’ve never grown flowers so I don’t know which ones would take up the least space while producing the most flowers for cutting. What would you suggest?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:19:36

      In a spot that small I recommend bordering two sides of the 4X4 plot with zinnias – they grow easily from seed, come in all colors and sizes and continue to bloom all season. You could plant the seeds now (or whenever it stops raining!)

      Reply

  47. Stephanie
    Apr 28, 2011 @ 16:06:13

    Hi Joy! I love your practical advice. Thanks! I have a question about Ground Clear. A couple of weeks ago my husband used it on some unplanted areas. Well, now we’ve been offered a bunch of roses (we have to transplant) but we are wondering they will be able to grow in the area that was treated. We are going to have to fortify and add to the dirt anyway.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:20:48

      I would need to know what the active ingredient is in that product to advise when to plant in that area. Let me know what the label says.

      Reply

  48. Lisa
    Apr 29, 2011 @ 10:31:46

    It’s Arbor Day! We have a few trees to plant. Yeah! Some are in the paper-cardboard type containers & some in plastic. We know the plastic container must come off, but does the grayish cardboard one?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:17:19

      If you just cut the bottom off the cardboard pot and then slice the sides up from the bottom in a few places you can plant the pot and all. But be sure the top edge of the container is below the surface of the soil.

      Reply

  49. Steve Jensen
    Apr 29, 2011 @ 13:13:40

    Do you happen to know where I might be able to locate seed potato’s?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:17:56

      I believe Western Garden Centers still have some varieties of seed potatoes.

      Reply

  50. Lynn Weakley
    May 01, 2011 @ 21:57:54

    Joy, I have an 1800 square foot flagstone patio with Irish Moss planted throughout. How can I keep the weeds down without harming the moss?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:24:06

      I really depends on what kinds of weeds are growing there. That is a large area to be down on hands and knees pulling little weeds! But when the soil is very moist it still might be the safest way to go. If they are grassy weeds, check the label on Grass-B-Gon to see if Irish Moss is one of the plants that resist damage. Since it isn’t a true moss you are going to kill it along with the weeds if you try something like RoundUp.

      Reply

  51. Marlene
    May 05, 2011 @ 08:55:10

    Joy I am looking for a tree to put outside my kitchen window. I would like to find one that smells good has a root tap and is round instead of so tall. I would also like it to be dense so i cant see in my neighbors kitchen window.
    Any suggestions. Thank you Marlene

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:24:44

      How tall would you like it to get?

      Reply

  52. Melba
    May 08, 2011 @ 18:38:21

    Hi Joy,
    Over Mother’s Day weekend we dug up some tulip bulbs from a friend’s garden. The were producing incredibly beautiful, tall stemmed, tulips. Can we plant the bulbs now, in SLC in May, or do we need to wait till fall? If we should wait till fall how should the bulbs be stored until they are planted? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 09, 2011 @ 09:26:00

      Replant right now….or when the rain stops. Plant the bulbs at least 6 inches deep – and space them about 2 inches apart. Don’t cut down the green leaves until they are brown/yellow.

      Reply

  53. Peg
    May 10, 2011 @ 12:34:25

    Joy, I need help. Two years ago, mushrooms started appearing in my front flower beds. Now I have tons of them coming up. How do you control them?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 19, 2011 @ 13:46:58

      Mushrooms indicate some kind of decaying organic material. It is sometimes the roots of trees long since cut down. Sometimes in a brand new home, contractors decided to bury some of the left over wood instead of carting it away. Sometimes the spoors came in with a load of mulch. Any which way, this long cool wet spell makes for perfect mushroom growing. When it warms up and dries out it will probably get better. In the meantime, rake off the button or whatever shape top and toss them in the garbage.

      Reply

  54. Brad Mortensen
    May 13, 2011 @ 19:01:37

    We have a blue spruce that we planted in our yard about 11 years ago; it is about 25 feet tall. It has brown rust colored needles all over it except for the new growth on the ends of the branches. What could this be and is there something we could do about it.

    We live in Syracuse Utah

    Thanks,

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 19, 2011 @ 14:01:23

      There are a number of fungal diseases that attack evergreens and Blue Spruce have been showing nasty symptoms of Needle Blast (at least I think that is the name) I recommend a good arborist to diagnosis the problem. Try ‘Tree Doctors’ 801 755-7438 Tell Mark I thought he could help or make recommendations.

      Reply

  55. Jennifer Strong
    May 17, 2011 @ 03:38:53

    Every year I try and grow cucumbers. I had success our first year, and then we rose the garden bed and boxed it in and made it bigger. Ever since then all I can get is flowers on my cucumber plants and not cucumbers. I also had this problem with my cantaloupe last year. What am I doing wrong? Is there something lacking in my soil, or do I have too much of something in my soil?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 31, 2011 @ 09:23:32

      First, the little male flowers on cucumber vines almost always form first and they never make the cucumbers. You can spot the female flowers on cucumbers and cantaloupes by checking for the small fruit that is already present at the base of the flower. Cucumbers need warm air (and soil) temperatures so it rarely pays to plant them early. This year especially. They also require rich soil – that means add extra good compost – and consistent water. And the more full sun the better for both of those plants.

      Reply

  56. lonnie
    May 20, 2011 @ 17:23:51

    Hi Joy,
    My question is about the use of manure tea. We have lots of horses and with all the rain we have alot of it. Does it need to age before I can use it? Can i just pour it on the flowers and vegetables. I have lots, come on over!!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 23, 2011 @ 21:00:26

      Dilute the tea until it is the color of, well, very very weak tea! Then you
      can pour away. Don’t let the tea sit around, just dilute and pour.

      Reply

  57. Brett
    May 21, 2011 @ 13:05:18

    My in-laws have a lilac bush behind there home that the city will taking out for a new road. The bush is fairly established. Is it possible to transplant the bush to another location? If so, how should I do it and how long can the bush be out of the ground?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 24, 2011 @ 16:47:01

      Lilacs are strongly rooted and if the bush is 5 or more years old it will be much easier and probably more successful if you buy a new plant.

      Reply

  58. Rachel
    May 23, 2011 @ 11:40:09

    Hey Joy,
    I am putting in a new yard this year. We have the grass in and we are working on trees and shrubs. I know there are different kinds of soil testing kits out there, but I was wondering if you happen to know what type of soil we have in Saratoga Springs. I live in the south end just past the gold course. I also have brought in good top soil, and compost for the flower beds. I am just worried about buying trees, and having them die on me. I am looking into a Cherry snow fountain, amur maple, praire fire crabapple, twisted laventer red bud. Anyway, is there anything you can tell me about the growing conditions out here?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 31, 2011 @ 09:30:18

      Hi Rachel,
      You can count on your soil being nearly lacking in organic matter and a fairly high pH. I’m not a fan of ‘top soil’ but there is always room for more compost! In fact, 3-4 inches should be added every year – either dug in or left as an excellent mulch on top of the soil – EVERY year! The Cherry tree and maybe the Red Bud are most at risk when there is poor drainage in the area. Test the soil drainage by digging a hole 12 inches deep and filling it with water. Keep track of how long in takes to drain and then fill it again. If it takes more than 12 hours to drain, you will have better success creating a berm to plant your trees. The berm only needs to be 8 to 10 inches high but make it fairly wide. And be sure to add 2-3 inches of compost as a mulch around anything you plant out there – not right against the trunk though, out a couple of inches.

      Reply

  59. vanessa
    May 27, 2011 @ 10:56:53

    I have a 4×8 raised garden box with 3 tomato plants, 3 green bell peppers, 2 green beans, 1 butternut squash, 4 romaine lettuce, 1 zucchini, 1 cucumbers and 2 peas. Do you think that’s too many vegetables, should I remove some plants or can I add more plants?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 31, 2011 @ 09:49:02

      After the lettuce and peas are finished (when the temperature finally gets hot) you could plant more beans in those areas. The cucumbers will do better if you give them a little trellis to climb on so they grow vertically. I corral my zucchini by making them grow up inside a tomato cage and that saves a lot of space; the butternut squash will ramble all over the place, but if you have the room, that will be fine! Only the roots need to stay in the nice soil in the box. Be sure to give the plants a lot of nutrients – try mulching with two inches of the best compost over the entire 8 X 4 box.

      Reply

  60. Linda Gardner
    May 27, 2011 @ 11:23:32

    I know we are suppose to spray for peach boor June 1 and July 1, however, what is the best product to use? Also my Kwangzi Cherry tree looks like one entire limb has boor . Should we just cut it down?
    Thank you, Linda

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 27, 2011 @ 21:40:53

      The Greater Peach Tree Borer attacks any fruit tree where the fruit has a pit: peach, nectarine, apricot, plum and cherry, including Flowering Plum and Cherry. The recommended treatment is the first week of July, August and September. All of our locally owned nurseries should be able to direct you to the best product for treatment. Remember, we only treat the bottom 12 inches or so of the trunk. Any damage in the upper branches has a different cause.

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 31, 2011 @ 09:38:08

      The spray schedule for fruit tree borer is the first of July, August and September and the treatment is for the bottom 12 inches or so of the trunk. Damage showing up in the branches is from another problem; that could well be damage from the terrible drop in temperature last November. If removing the damaged branch leaves a tree that is horribly out of shape, consider removing the tree.

      Reply

  61. ANGIE
    May 27, 2011 @ 13:54:56

    I have some questions about tree’s. I have lost quite a few tree’s this year from the winter . I lost a kwanza cherry tree, a weeping cherry, a nectarine and possibly a red bud. My Red Bud and Kwanza were very well established, my question is what are the best kind of tree’s to plant in West Jordan???
    My Red bud lost a huge branch in the winter so I am thinking this is why it is struggling. Any help you can offer would be great.
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 31, 2011 @ 09:35:19

      This year even well established trees and shrubs showed terrible damage and many died altogether from the drastic temperature drop last November. Any type of cherry tree is bothered by heavy soil that is slow to drain – it puts them under stress and more susceptible to other problems. Red Bud is also apt to show problems early as it is just on this side of being hardy here. Two suggestions: dig in 3-4 inches of good compost plus an inch or so of Utelite in the entire bed where trees or shrubs will be planted. Then dig a test hole 10-12 inches deep and fill it with water, let it drain and fill it again to test the drainage. You may need to build a berm to allow for proper drainage around the roots.

      Reply

  62. Beckie
    Jun 02, 2011 @ 21:12:44

    Dear Joy,
    I so enjoy your appearances on Good Things Utah, and your radio program when I can listen. I was hoping you could help me with a flower garden issue, when we moved in our home 16 years ago, there was a small patch of what I call “Star flowers” usually in March they start to spring up and look like thick long very green grass, then in May during the sunniest part of the day, they have prolific white flowers that open in the day and close at night. The bulbs have spread all over 2 flower beds and have become an extreme nuisance, a shovel full will be 3/4 bulbs from star flowers and the balance dirt. I would love to rid my garden of them but I don’t want to harm my many perenials. If you have any suggestions I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks a million.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 03, 2011 @ 08:39:02

      Oh dear. Those are Star of Bethlehem. One of the ways they spread is by sneaking a ride on your shovel! The bulblets are as little as a BB and any soil that sticks to a gardening tool after working around them is sure to have Star of Bethlehem with it. Make sure you never let the flowers go to seed – and after that it is cut, pull, slash, pull, whack, cut, slash, etc. forever. Sorry. I have a small clump in a path in my garden – it’s been there for 10+ years. After the flowers are spent, I cut it off and then, as the greens keep coming back, I run over them with a wheelbarrow, stomp on them, cut them off……….over and over for the rest of the growing season.

      Reply

  63. Peggy
    Jun 03, 2011 @ 13:22:08

    Help!!!! We bought 5 dwarf fruit trees on deep discount from Lowe’s believing we were going to be able to purchase a home on a short sale. It fell through, and we live in an apartment. I know, it was crazy to buy them, but they were $3.00 a piece and the house purchase was looking so positive. What do we do with the trees now? I would really like to keep them, we will be buying a home if not this fall then definitely next spring. How can we keep them and keep them alive and growing on a patio for the next 6-12 months? Is that even possible? Our patio is south facing. They are currently still in the plastic pouch bags we bought them in. We really would like your advice!!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 07, 2011 @ 10:28:01

      They should do fine in containers – 12-14″ is probably the minimum suggested size. Use good potting soil and check the roots for any dead or damaged ones, prune the bad ones off. I hope the trees are starting to leaf out by now – after trimming the roots, soak the roots in tepid water while you get the pots ready. Water well after you plant the trees, no fertilizer for the first couple of weeks at least, and put them in the shade of the patio until they start showing new (more new) growth and then give them as much sun as you can. Directions for planting should be on the bags they came in.

      Reply

  64. Sherry Wasden
    Jun 06, 2011 @ 09:03:30

    Hi Joy …looking for some help in in redesigning my back yard, I have a plan but the bids have been “out of this world”… I could build a new house for the costs they are giving me. Do you have any suggestions?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 06, 2011 @ 15:45:41

      Hey Sherry! Just visited at the home of a friend of yours – she said she had talked with you. A consultation for ideas and directions may be very helpful to you. Email, askjoy@joyinthegarden.com and we’ll see if something I can do will help.

      Reply

  65. Sherlyn Moore
    Jun 08, 2011 @ 15:02:32

    Joy, I’m wondering about spraying my fruit trees. When do I start and with what?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 17, 2011 @ 17:32:27

      Hi Sherlyn,
      It depends on which tree and what you are trying to control. This link is superb for keeping everyone up to date on what and when to spray. They send a newsletter every week for no charge. < http://utahpests.usu.edu/ipm/htm/subscriptions> .

      Reply

  66. Dixie Baker
    Jun 08, 2011 @ 17:31:32

    I heard that you have an effective way to get rid of Star of Bethlehem–my husband has been digging for days. Is there something I can put on it and still use the land for edibles?

    Thanks,

    Dixie
    (I was introduced to you in the Marriott Center at Women’s Conference.)

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 17, 2011 @ 17:36:37

      Well, my stock answer is……….move. But short of that I’m not much help. I can warn about using a shovel and then taking the shovel to work in another part of the garden: the little bulblets are so tiny that they can cling to the tiniest amount of soil and then hitch a ride to another part of your yard to begin the invasion ‘over there’. RoundUp can be used in soil that will grow edibles but it has a minimum effect on the Star of Bethlehem.

      Reply

  67. Karen Peavler
    Jun 11, 2011 @ 11:16:43

    Joy:

    I listen to you often on Saturday. My question is I have several interior plants broadleaf etc. I have a continuous problem with the leafs turning black on the tips until they completely die. I have changed the soil cut back on water cut back of frequency of water etc. I am not sure if it is over watering or under watering etc. Do you have a suggestion on what may be the issue. I have figured out that they do better with less direct sunlight.

    Thank you kindly for your suggestions in advance.

    Sincerely,

    Karen Peavler
    Roy, UT 84067

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 17, 2011 @ 17:58:16

      There are several house plants that do not tolerate fluorine in the water….and the symptoms match what you are describing. Try using the least expensive bottled water for a couple of weeks, especially on new plants, and see what happens. It is very easy to over water, make sure the soil is quite dry before adding additional water. There are houseplants that won’t tolerate direct sunlight, and it sounds like you may have some of those. To clean up your plants with the black edges, trim with little sharp scissors to make them look better. Just take off the edges that are affected.

      Reply

      • Joy
        Jun 17, 2011 @ 17:59:21

        There are several house plants that do not tolerate fluorine in the water….and the symptoms match what you are describing. Try using the least expensive bottled water for a couple of weeks, especially on new plants, and see what happens. It is very easy to over water, make sure the soil is quite dry before adding additional water. There are houseplants that won’t tolerate direct sunlight, and it sounds like you may have some of those. To clean up your plants with the black edges, trim with little sharp scissors to make them look better. Just take off the edges that are affected.

        Reply

  68. Brad
    Jun 14, 2011 @ 18:09:21

    Hi Joy – I have a question for you. I have a really nice honey locust tree in the front of my house that was budding in the spring but hasn’t produced any leaves yet. We have two other locust trees in the yard that are both doing great. The bark on the “sick” one is still green and the branches don’t appear to be dead. Have you seen this happening this year? I’ve thought about pulling it out but it’s about 10 years old and a great tree. I’d hate to get rid of it and find out it was just sick for a year and could have come back next year. Is that even possible? Any suggestions?

    Reply

  69. Donna
    Jun 18, 2011 @ 10:16:11

    Where can I buy Ladybugs got the aphids on my apple trees??
    Thank you so much love your show!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 21, 2011 @ 16:03:55

      Those were from Wasatch Shadows Nursery, in Sandy. Maybe a nursery nearer to you is carrying them….call and find out.

      Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 28, 2011 @ 21:28:44

      Those were from Wasatch Shadows – check with them first to see if they still have any, then call around to other local nurseries near you.

      Reply

  70. Adrienne
    Jun 18, 2011 @ 11:40:37

    Hi Joy,
    I was listening to the show this morning and you were mentioning that there are a few local nurseries that are carrying heirloom seeds. I would like to plug a great local resource. Kenyon Organics sells seeds and plants in Salt Lake City. I have been getting plants from them for a few years now. They are incredibly involved in the community and a great supporters of other local businesses. I would love to hear them get a plug on your show.
    Thanks for the great information!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 21, 2011 @ 16:02:52

      Super! can you send me more information? Or, have them get in touch with me directly.

      Reply

  71. Brad
    Jun 21, 2011 @ 21:01:49

    Hi Joy – I have a question for you. I have a really nice honey locust tree in the front of my house that was budding in the spring but hasn’t produced any leaves yet. We have two other locust trees in the yard that are both doing great. The bark on the “sick” one is still green and the branches don’t appear to be dead. Have you seen this happening this year? I’ve thought about pulling it out but it’s about 10 years old and a great tree. I’d hate to get rid of it and find out it was just sick and has the possibility of coming back next year. Is that even possible? Any suggestions?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 28, 2011 @ 21:27:40

      We lost many, many trees and shrubs this past year – if the tree has yet to leaf out, I think it is a lost cause. Should it begin to show growth, I suspect most of the branches are going to only have leaves near the trunk with the outer part of the branches dead. You can give it another week or so, and remember that it needs less water when it has very few leaves. I hope it will recover but the chances are slim. Let me know how it does.

      Reply

  72. Kristina Hepworth
    Jul 04, 2011 @ 21:20:17

    Hi Joy, My vegetable plants leaves have just recently…in the last 3 days…been eaten away. So far it looks like it’s just been my squash and cabbage plants. Any suggestions on what could be doing it and what to do to take care of it? I’ve already put stuff down for the snails, so it’s not them. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 11, 2011 @ 10:43:19

      You put stuff down but have you seen any empty shells? Did you go out at night with a flashlight to be sure it was the snail problem? Grasshoppers are now making an appearance – you can usually spot those critters on the leaves in the cool of the morning. They move quite slowly until the sun warms them up. Are the entire leaves missing or just most of the leaf?

      Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 14, 2011 @ 11:11:42

      Before we can go after the culprit, we need to identify the chewer….night time with a flashlight will be your best bet for catch the pest in action. It also helps to water the garden that afternoon or early evening, brings out more critters that way. I like the product Sluggo-Plus for around my veggie garden.

      Reply

  73. Jeannie Jepson
    Jul 07, 2011 @ 12:43:26

    I have a plumeria plant that I have been growing for the last six years. My daughter brought it back from Hawaii. Yesterday, I noticed that there are yellow/green mushrooms growing at the base of it. My plant is very healthy to look at. I have NO idea on how the mushrooms began growing there. do you know what kind they are, and if they are bad for my plant or family? I would send you a picture, but there is no way to do this. Thank you, Jeannie

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 11, 2011 @ 10:40:45

      Mushrooms usually indicate the presence of decaying organic material. It is a rare mushroom that causes and damage to plants. I admire your ability to keep it growing this long! Not many folks can get a Plumaria any where near that old. I would gently remove the mushrooms, wash your hands after you throw them away. Check to see if the mushrooms were growing from the stem or maybe just organic matter in the soil. Then keep on doing whatever it is that you are obviously doing right!

      Reply

  74. amy
    Jul 09, 2011 @ 09:51:38

    Hi Joy, I have fairly low growing evergreen bushes that will grow to provide a hedge. They have been in for 3 years and were growing fairly well. This year they have started to brown in the middle (dead) while the outside ring is still green. I know it is not underwatered because we’re in Park City and we had so much moisture and we have a drip system. Perhaps too much water or a disease. Any ideas on how to care for these?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 11, 2011 @ 10:37:25

      I suspect the damage may be from the sudden drop to winter last fall. At least that is what has done so much damage to shrubs and trees down at lower elevations. It could also be a problem of overwatering. Be sure to check the soil both before and after you run the system. Don’t water if you find moisture down an inch or so.
      Are these needled evergreens or broadleaf evergreens?

      Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 18, 2011 @ 07:37:20

      The prime suspect in the problem is our wild temperature fluctuation last fall. I’ve seen many shrubs and even trees with similar problems this year. Right now the only thing to do is cut out the obviously dead branches – don’t leave stubs or stumps, cut back to the next live stem. i wouldn’t do or change anything else unless there is an increase in the number of dead branches.

      Reply

  75. Jim Bills
    Jul 09, 2011 @ 16:31:37

    Hello Joy,

    My wife and I recently built a home next to the Provo River in Midway. With the high water this year, an area where we planted maples and flowering plums is now a bog. Can those trees survive this type of environment for long or should I move them now?

    Thank you

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 11, 2011 @ 10:34:58

      It takes time to know for sure – are their leaves still green or healthy looking? After the water recedes, check the roots and crown (where the trunk meets the roots) and see if they are firm and a light color. This isn’t a good time to move them because we will be shooting back to the upper 90’s very soon.

      Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 18, 2011 @ 07:40:01

      It depends on how long the roots were deprived of oxygen in the soil – since it sounds like these are fairly new trees, they may not be able to bounce back since they have a limited root development. Moving probably wouldn’t improve their chances so I vote for waiting to see if they put out new leaves.

      Reply

  76. Lois Ann Garlitz
    Jul 11, 2011 @ 07:38:18

    Hi Joy, Would you remind me what I am saving these crunched-up egg shells for, to combat critters in my garden (I think) or some other enhancement? I could not find this info. in your book.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 11, 2011 @ 10:32:34

      Finely ground egg shells are used to deter slugs and snails. But you need to put out more if the shells get wet – the critters slide right over them

      Reply

  77. Michelle
    Jul 13, 2011 @ 12:52:49

    Dear Joy, We are trying to have an organic garden but we have a lot of pests. Aphids, Earwigs, Black ants, and Red ants. We never had Aphids till this year but we don’t know how to get rid of any them. Do you have anyways organically to get rid of them? If you don’t then other means would be welcome too. Please answer soon they are a growing problem. 🙂

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 18, 2011 @ 07:53:14

      Hi Michelle, for ants I recommend DE (diatomaceous earth) it is a very fine white powder made of silica. It is like tiny glass shards that poke holes in the exoskeletons of the insects. Use it along their trails and even in the house if they have invaded. Just dust lightly – it is harmless to you as long as you don’t create a dust cloud and breathe it into your lungs, you can even eat it, though I don’t know why anyone would! Ladybugs, Lacewings, etc. will eventually catch up with the aphids and keep them in control. Until then, try washing them off with just a strong spray of water, and then, if they are still in huge numbers, use insecticidal soap.

      Reply

  78. Tauna
    Jul 13, 2011 @ 15:30:12

    I planted tomatoes and zucchini and 5 gal garden bucket where I water the plants by pouring water into PVC pipe that go to the bottom of the bucket.
    I have beautiful plants however my crooked necked squash start to shrivel up
    when they get about 3 inches long. The plant is continuing to bloom and produce squash but they die off after they get to be about 3 inches long. What
    do you suggest that I do?

    Reply

  79. Tauna
    Jul 14, 2011 @ 21:42:17

    I have my crooked necked squash in a garden bucket where I keep it watered by filling the bottom bucket with water through a PVC pipe. The bucket is kept
    constantly filled with water. The plant is beautiful and big and I am getting a lot of squash but when they get about 3 inches long they shrivel up and die. What am I doing wrong?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 18, 2011 @ 08:39:51

      I’ve had others with the same problem and my own summer squash are doing the same thing. I think it is possibly a pollination problem: the flower isn’t getting completely pollinated; and, the fluctuation of temperatures is probably a factor as well. I’ve eaten two meals from my two plants, the current little squash look like they will all fall off, they are just as you described, and I have others coming on. My plants don’t get watered as consistently as yours, and that is part of my problem. So, we’ll check back in another week or so and see if our little summer squash is doing any better.

      Reply

  80. Pam Garrett
    Jul 16, 2011 @ 11:08:05

    Joy, I had two beautiful hanging planters with million bells and petunias. As of two days ago they started looking lifeless and I see small aphids on them. Is it too late to salvage them? What is the best treatment, I already sprayed them with Lysol. Thanks so much, PAM

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 25, 2011 @ 13:58:16

      This time of year it is a good time to cut back planters, especially petunias, and fertilize them well. Cut the stems by half, and yes, they will be quite short. Did the color part of the flowers disappear? sometimes the tobacco budworm will totally munch the flowers but not touch the leaves. Try a spray of Insecticidal Soap for the aphids. But if the color has disappeared, try Dipel or Thuricide. Those will kill the little worms (caterpillars) but not hurt anything else.

      Reply

  81. Mike
    Jul 16, 2011 @ 11:26:18

    Joy,
    We have a Maple tree with purple leaves that isn’t doing to well. We just moved into our home last September and the tree looked like it was doing fine except it had a white fungus on the leaves. We had a man come out to treat the tree. This year it is not doing to well. The leaves are small and curled up and feel a little dry. I don’t see any fungus. There are portions of the branches that do not have leaves. The tree has a base of 6 inches and is about 12 to 15 feet tall. At the base of the tree there is a dug out circle of about two feet. It is about two inches deep. The tree gets watered six times a week for 20 minutes each time. What can we do to save this tree. Thanks for your help.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 18, 2011 @ 08:35:25

      First, the tree should be watered out at the “drip line” which is where the water drips off of the outer most leaves. The basin around the trunk of the tree is a super way to be sure the line trimmer/lawnmower doesn’t hit and nick the bark but water shouldn’t be put there. Water in that basin will encourage root/crown rot and eventually kill the tree. A tree of that size will do just fine with water twice a month so cut way back on the water.

      Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 25, 2011 @ 14:02:59

      Hold off on the water! once every two weeks, tops. The branches without leaves may have been damaged this past winter and/or bothered by a disease called Anthracnose, not usually fatal but it will kill one branch at a time.

      Reply

  82. Leif Nelson
    Jul 19, 2011 @ 17:59:55

    Joy- I have a squirrel infestation in my garden. The fun of yelling, “Squirrel!” when we spot them has long worn off. We saw a squirrel rolling a ripe tomato off into the bushes the other day, and have been finding half-eaten peas and other items in the garden. Any suggestions for repelling these pests? A fellow employee suggested a flame thrower, but I’m not fond of fried green tomatoes.

    Thanks!

    Reply

  83. Pam Tyson
    Jul 20, 2011 @ 14:39:02

    Joy,

    Help!!!! Something weird is going on with my zuchinni plants. In the morning they are purkey but then when the hot sun hits them the leafs look wilted. I keep watering them so I know there getting enough water. I cannot figure out why there fine first thing in the morning and look horrible the rest of the day.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 20, 2011 @ 15:13:37

      It’s the heat!! Squash and some other large-leafed plants collapse their leaves during the day to conserve moisture. The underside of the leaves is where the stomata (little openings that allow air and moisture in and out of the leaf) are concentrated and they respond to the cooler, darker more humid space under the leaf by closing a little and that slows down the loss of water. This little trick can lead to way over watering if you are not careful. The squash may need water daily if there is wind along with heat, but check the soil moisture before you water. Since they are perking up in the morning I don’t think they are suffering from drought.

      Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 25, 2011 @ 16:32:49

      Large leaved squash often ‘close the umbrella’ by letting the leaves wilt down to reduce moisture loss during hot days. The little stomata on the underside of the leaves release water as well as oxygen. The wilting is a self preservation technique. Be careful that you don’t compensate for the wilting by overwatering. Check the soil moisture and as long as they perk up in the evening, they have plenty of water.

      Reply

  84. Jeanne
    Jul 27, 2011 @ 15:26:03

    Joy, I asked you about my raspberries last fall – they had been in for 8 years, with very little or no fruit. You said to leave them without trimming, which I did. I had great fruit this year.

    Now I want to know what to do to trim them down. They are all over the ground, even though they are in a box 12 inches off the ground. Can I trim off the branches that bore fruit? I notice I have other shoots that had no fruit and are just growing tall. Should I leave those? I’d like to have raspberries again next year!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 28, 2011 @ 15:17:45

      Cut the ones that had raspberries back by a third and leave the new ones to grow berries next year. After the first crop on the old canes next year, cut them to the ground and start the process over for the next year.
      Congrats on the berries – they are the best!

      Reply

  85. Janie Young
    Jul 31, 2011 @ 19:54:43

    Joy, we have two beautiful Sycamores in front of our home. They are so big this year that the lower branches are hanging over the sidewalk. Neighbors have a difficult time getting around the lower branches without getting a leaf or two in the face. We plan to cut a few of the lower branches off but had heard that we need to wait until the fall or winter because of the sap. Can you tell me if this is true or can we remove branches at any time?

    Reply

  86. lani
    Aug 02, 2011 @ 09:34:14

    Joy,

    Two broccoli questions. I have broccoli plants that have not gotten heads yet. They are full grown. Will they still produce. I guess I planted them from seed to late. Second. I have everbearing broccoli. What a joke. I have not gotten enough off of all of them for one meal. If I cut them way down, will they produce larger heads? Thank you.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 27, 2011 @ 09:21:08

      The Tomato Hornworm!! It can nearly destroy a tomato plant but if you snip of a part of the plant plus the caterpillar and put it in a quart jar you may be treated to seeing it become a lovely butterfly.

      Reply

  87. Karen
    Aug 03, 2011 @ 19:45:24

    I live in Eagle Mountain, UT
    I found a big fat 4″ long (caterpillar, grub, or slug)?
    It’s black with thin yellow diagonal stripes on each side.
    It has a black horn on it’s rear and it poops green pellets.
    It’s about 1″ around and 4″ long.
    I found it under a weed along the cool damp ground.
    do you have any idea what this “creature” is????

    Reply

  88. Lani
    Aug 04, 2011 @ 20:56:48

    I wrote the other day but do not see my question now. I have some everbearing broccoli and have not gotten anything substantial from them. If I cut them short, will the broccoli buds be bigger? Also I planted some broccoli from seeds, they have not budded yet. Should I leave them or tear them out so I can plant some fall broccoli.

    Reply

  89. Ann Wall
    Aug 08, 2011 @ 18:51:38

    I have a hanging basket of petunias which grew fast and was very beautiful.. I fed it Miracle Gro once a week and watered it faithfully every day. About 2 weeks ago the underneath leaves started turning brown and crisp. They have steadily progressed to 3/4 of the plant. I am wondering what went wrong and if i have time to change it back. Thank you for your consideration.

    Reply

  90. Tiffany
    Aug 24, 2011 @ 11:19:39

    What should I do about an aspen tree with dark brown spots on the leaves? The leaves have yellowed along with the brown spots and it is affecting all the leaves on the tree…It is near another aspen that appears healthy. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 27, 2011 @ 09:24:07

      It might be a blight – try splitting a stem lengthwise if this happens again and see if the center portion is a nice even light color. There are other diseases and even insects that might cause this. Enough sunlight can be a factor as well. Long about the middle to end of July I recommend cutting petunias right in half, meaning half the length. They always tend to get leggy anyway and this might allow more light into the lower leaves.

      Reply

  91. Gerda
    Aug 24, 2011 @ 20:05:30

    Joy,
    My strawberries are growing in a very large clay pot on my porch in Provo. How do I best protect them in the coming winter?
    Thank you very much for your help!
    Gerda

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 27, 2011 @ 09:26:21

      Usually unglazed clay pots don’t hold up well through the winter. The freeze and thaw cycles often cause them to flake. If you can insulate it in some way, actually to keep it consistently cold without thawing, it might help. You do need to water the plants during the winter. Only water when the air temperature is well above 32 degrees.

      Reply

  92. Gerda
    Aug 24, 2011 @ 20:13:09

    Joy,
    My strawberries are growing in a very large clay pot on my porch in Provo. How can I pretect them from freezing in the coming winter?
    Thank you for your help!
    Gerda

    Reply

  93. Evelyn Johnson
    Sep 02, 2011 @ 10:12:18

    We planted our garden in July( quite late this year) but we wanted some veggies. My husband has fertilized every other week and now we have these monster tomato plants, green peepers and 4 different kind of squash. Everything is delicious, except the tomoto’s are very large and green. They have been this way for 10 days or so and still have not turned red. We have cut back on the water –our plants are 4 feet tall and about 50 tomatos on the 2 plants. We are hoping they are going to turn red soon. Help!!

    Reply

  94. Margo
    Sep 03, 2011 @ 11:37:21

    Hi Joy

    My little pine shrubs and trees are not doing well. I have had Tru Green treat for insects but no improvement. I am wondering what is causing sections of tree to look dead while other parts are just fine. Help! Also we have necrotic ring…making yard look terrible. What is best solution…it is speading and my yard is getting worse!

    Reply

  95. Britt Shirley
    Sep 03, 2011 @ 21:19:08

    Hi Joy-
    We really enjoy listening to your radio program. My husband and I were wanting to know your thoughts on how close to the wall on a north-facing home you can plant a garden. We are moving and the current homeowners have a garden that is directly against the north-facing wall of their home. Do we need to move it away from the wall and if so, how far?

    Thank you!

    Reply

  96. Britt Shirley
    Sep 03, 2011 @ 21:21:11

    Hi Joy-
    My husband and I enjoy listening to your radio program. We are purchasing a new home and the current homeowners have their garden right up against the north-facing wall of the home. Is it okay to leave the garden this close to the north wall of the home or do we need to move it away from the wall? If so, how far away from the wall do you recommend moving it?
    Thank you!

    Reply

  97. Kirsten
    Sep 05, 2011 @ 18:00:40

    We had a peach branch that broke and the peaches that are on it are not ripe yet. I’ve looked on the Internet to see if it’s possible to ripen them off the branch and I’ve gotten, “Yes you can,” and, “No, you can’t.” What is your opinion? If it’s a “yes” is it by putting them in a paper bag? Thanks so much Joy!!!

    Reply

  98. G. Clark
    Sep 14, 2011 @ 10:54:52

    I have little “sucker” trees coming up all around the base of my trees. I have clipped them back at ground level and the darn things just keep growing back. What can I do to get rid of the pesky suckers without hurting the actual trees?

    Reply

  99. Ben
    Sep 15, 2011 @ 17:03:19

    Joy,

    I saw your Good Things Utah segment today. I am a manager/buyer at Linden Nursery in UT C0unty. Our best fruit tree inventory is now. We also provide the service of bringing in Dave Wilson fruit trees on the SOFT program. We’d appreciate your help spreading the word. We have the best selection of Dave Wilson fruit trees in the state!!! Come check us out.

    Reply

  100. Tricia
    Sep 21, 2011 @ 10:55:35

    Joy, I love your segments on Good Things Utah. I always look forward to the pearls of wisdom that you share. I watched the segment today on mulches. I enjoyed that one as well, but when you got to the cocoa mulch I so wanted you to mention that that cocoa mulch can be deadly to dogs. Not sure if you were aware of that or not, but it can kill a dog if they happen to eat it. Just as chocolate is lethal for dogs so is the cocoa mulch.

    Thank you so much for your wonderful knowledge and enthusiasm. You inspire us.

    Reply

  101. Marjorie Jones
    Sep 21, 2011 @ 11:40:39

    Hi Joy,
    A couple of months ago I plant two dogwood trees. Even thought I have watered them every day and sometimes twice a day, the leave are very dry aroung the edges and I’m afraid they are not going to make it. The one planted in full sun is the worst. I’m hoping with the cooler weather I can save them. Any help would be appreciated.
    Thank you,
    Marjorie

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 27, 2011 @ 09:34:22

      If you send the trees to Virginia or Pennsylvania or maybe Washington or Georgia they would do very well. We have none of the conditions that make Dogwood trees happy. They need filtered shade, well drained soil and mulch around the dripline. Watering daily or every other day is probably making the problem worse. The brown edges indicate that the leaves are losing more water than they can take up – it doesn’t mean there is not enough water in the soil, just that the evaporation and transpiration is way, way too much water leaving the plant. Always check the soil down about 3 inches before you water – moist soil means wait a day or two before watering but check again before adding the water.
      Good luck, I’ve only seen two dogwood trees doing well in the valley in the last 40 years.

      Reply

  102. Bev
    Sep 28, 2011 @ 11:09:57

    Do you give presentations in the evening? I am looking for a “presenter” for next April 19 for a senior ladies’ club. An hour of information on “pot gardening” outside and/or ideas on indoor plants that thrive would be most helpful. Thanks

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 26, 2011 @ 13:45:42

      I do make that kind of presentation – I don’t charge but do appreciate $20 for gasoline. Is the club in the SL valley? And I do apologize for the terrible delay, I’ve experienced a computer glitch of major proportion.

      Reply

  103. Julie Tanner
    Oct 02, 2011 @ 12:20:31

    Hi Joy,

    About 3 years ago we planted some arborvitae bushes near our driveway that the deer come down and nibble away at during the winter and eat them down to nubs, then the grow back somewhat in the summer. What can I do to prevent the deer from eating the bushes, they killed one of them, but we still have 3 left. Help!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 26, 2011 @ 13:42:56

      You can try the commercial deer repellant like Liquid Fence or wrap the shrubs with burlap. Or build an eight foot fence!

      Reply

  104. Marcie Christensen
    Oct 07, 2011 @ 12:29:12

    When is the best time to prune fruit trees? Fall or Spring?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 26, 2011 @ 13:40:41

      Spring, just as the buds barely begin to swell.

      Reply

  105. Brandie Bird
    Oct 17, 2011 @ 08:02:32

    I was wondering what you would recommend for a small greenhouse type thing. I have no room in my house to start seeds indoors. And not a lot of money to spend on a nice set up.
    I have seen a shelf product with a plastic cover on Gurneys.com. What do you think of these products?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 26, 2011 @ 13:39:29

      I’ve seen those too – look good, but expensive. If you are handy at DIY projects, you could create a set up using a 4 foot shop light hung by small chains. The lights must be within about an inch of the tops of the plants, but as the plants grow you can raise the lamp. A friend of mine does the opposite: he has the light stay at one height and starts the plant container out on top of 2X4s and then removes one board at a time as the little plants grow. But if you’d rather get one ready made, check out Gardener’s Supply and a couple other sources before buying from Gurney.

      Reply

  106. Lesia Hoopes
    Oct 19, 2011 @ 17:09:05

    I live in Draper and was weeding the flower beds today and noticed little yellow bugs on the leaves. They are very tiny smaller than rice. What is it and how can I get rid of them. October 19, 2011

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 26, 2011 @ 13:35:29

      Sorry this took so long! Computer change over has tied things up for a while. I do suspect the bugs might have been (or maybe still are) aphids, which come in several different colors. If the little bugs weren’t moving they may have been the eggs of some other insect. A good hard freeze will take care of the aphids. If you figure they might be eggs, the best remedy is to snip off the leaf and throw in the garbage.

      Reply

  107. David Sampson
    Oct 21, 2011 @ 11:56:27

    We have a zelkova serrata (Japanese Zelkova) tree, 23 years old. Can you tell me whether the bark splitting in the tree trunk is normal, or is this a symptom of a problem?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 26, 2011 @ 13:31:48

      Not normal but fairly common if it is on the west or south side of the trunk. This “south west” winter damage can be prevented by using a white tree wrap or painting the trunk with white latex paint cut 50/50 with water. The idea is to keep the bark cool so it doesn’t start the sap flowing during days that get above freezing and then drop to near zero during the winter night.

      Reply

  108. Brooke
    Nov 05, 2011 @ 15:51:16

    Hi Joy, What do you recommend for winterizing Endless Summer Hydrangeas? The leaves have turned brown. Should I pull them off or wait for them to drop? I’ve read that you should cover the plants if temperatures are to drop below 5 or 10 degrees. Will Chicken Wire and burlap suffice? Or do I need more?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jan 05, 2012 @ 10:16:38

      I apologize for the delayed response….I’d like to blame it on a new computer, which I will, but also my trip to Pittsburgh put me “out of the loop” for several weeks. Right now the danger is the mild temperatures – the poor little things may break dormancy. If you didn’t get a chance for the burlap, now is the time. An additional cage of chicken wire filled with leaves might help also. Do the cover up while the temperatures are below freezing – the idea is to keep them evenly cool, not keep them warm.

      Reply

  109. Kim Kimber
    Nov 07, 2011 @ 14:01:49

    Dear Joy,
    I am desperate. I was given a Monrovia Rose Tree in August. It has done beautifully. I went out of town the last week of October. I was afraid of the frost so brought it house while gone. It did well. I did find new fall colored growth on the tips. They were covered with aphids. I cut them off and sprayed with detergent mix and water. That night I left it by front door covered because of the cold. Now it looks sad and droopy. What do I do now? I don’t want to loose it. Do I bring in the house or leave it out to freeze till Spring.
    Thank you ever so much-you are the only one I trust to help. KK

    Reply

  110. Dennis Allen
    Nov 08, 2011 @ 09:48:37

    Hi Joy, Does English Walnut tree leaves make a good mulch for the garden? I know that some trees put out something that kills anything that grows under the tree.

    Dennis Allen

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 07, 2012 @ 09:43:24

      It is the Black Walnut that causes some growing problems. Shred the leaves from your walnut first and they should do fine as a mulch.

      Reply

  111. Catherine Young
    Dec 12, 2011 @ 02:45:32

    I have been researching columnar fruit trees on the internet. I want to plant several next to my home. How far away from the foundation should I plant them? Also, I can only find columnar apple trees here in the US, but in the UK it appears that there are also plum and pear columnar trees. Is it possible to get something besides columnar apple tree here?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jan 05, 2012 @ 10:06:45

      Hi Catherine,
      Try Dave Wilson Nursery. They have a remarkable selection of hard-to-find fruit and nut trees. Their online catalog is wonderful.

      Reply

  112. Randie
    Jan 03, 2012 @ 14:58:13

    hi joy….. my lilac bushes…. snowball bush…. crabapple tree have buds on them…. what will this mean in the spring? thanks!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jan 05, 2012 @ 10:09:46

      I’m afraid that is the results of our nearly 60 degree days and unusually mild nights. There isn’t anything we can do about this – so, keep your arms and legs inside the car at all times until the ride has come to a complete stop. Only time will give us the answers.
      Oh, I’m in the car right behind you!

      Reply

  113. Caycee VanDam
    Jan 05, 2012 @ 06:59:15

    Hello Joy!!! The weather has been so beautiful and nice for all of us to enjoy!!! But, in the past week I have noticed a lot of my trees are enjoying it too and are starting to bud. I thought to myself, oh no! It’s only the first week in January. Do I need to be concerned?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jan 05, 2012 @ 10:12:50

      Hi Caycee,
      Probably. I am, anyway. There is nothing we can do about the trees’ response to this March-like weather so we just wait and keep our fingers crossed. Many shrubs are also budding early; we can hope for good snow cover to moderate the temperature in the soil but there isn’t much else we can do.

      Reply

  114. Steve Wheeler
    Jan 07, 2012 @ 14:10:29

    I have 6 12-year-old cottonless cottonwood trees. This year two of them had some wart-shaped clumps where a new leaf was trying to form. I was told to use Bayer systemic. It did no good. They got worse. I tried liquid tree insecticide. It did no good. Almost all of the trees had a few by the end of the summer. They are ruining my trees. Please help me. I also have three weeping willows. I’ve tried everything, including drilling holes three years in a row and putting medicine plugs in them. The leaves are yelllowing and dying. It just gets worse each spring. Thanks for having such a wonderful radio show. It is my Saturday event. You are the Glenn Beck of Green.

    Reply

  115. Dr. Scott Jones
    Jan 10, 2012 @ 09:29:28

    We need help balancing our desire for beautiful flower beds, with the problem of neighborhood cats who love to dig in and displace our well placed mulch, bark and other materials. How can we have any hope of laying out these bedding areas AND keep the cats from sharing their ‘fertilizer’ with us too? Got any great cat-b-gone formula?

    Reply

  116. Suzanne
    Jan 14, 2012 @ 09:28:13

    Hi Joy!
    I have a different kind of question for you. A friend of mine (not LDS) took a trip up to Nauvoo and visited Carthage Jail and collected a few acorns from the Oak tree that was living at the time of Joseph Smiths killing. He sent me several hoping that I could find somewhere to plant them.

    My questions are: Do you know what type of Oak tree is growing there? Do you know if that kind can grow out here somewhere in Utah? Would it need irrigation? Any other suggestions?

    Thank you Joy. I’ve really enjoyed listening to your show over the past 5 years since I moved here from Michigan and I hope your respiratory illness leaves quickly!

    Reply

  117. Ray Van Eperen
    Jan 17, 2012 @ 10:38:51

    Joy. First of all, thanks for your show. I enjoy listening as often as I can. I have a question about the use of small inexpensive greenhouses. I would like to use one to begin seeds in late winter, and maybe extend some growing into winter such as some lettuce etc. My question is whether or not they are adequate to fend off the cold we can get even in early spring before planting time. I do have warming mats for under seed beds (that I suppose you can also use under plant pots), but don’t know if additional heat would be required. Is there anything else I should know about their use? Here is a link to an example of the type of greenhouse I am referring to: http://www.amazon.com/Gardman-R687-4-Tier-Mini-Greenhouse/dp/B000NCTGQE/ref=pd_sim_ol_7

    Reply

  118. Lucy
    Jan 18, 2012 @ 15:49:46

    Hi Joy,
    I love your show! I also bought your lovely book full of insight and wit. I have just a simple question.

    Can I grow Italian Cypress Trees in Orem, UT? I appreciate your time in responding this question in advance.

    All the best,
    Lucy Monson

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 07, 2012 @ 09:41:44

      Hi Lucy,
      Sorry, but the Italian Cypress won’t winter here. But I have seen Leyland Cypress manage to make it in Utah County.

      Reply

  119. Shaunna Tuttle
    Jan 25, 2012 @ 18:55:13

    Joy,

    Do you still speak at Relief Society meetings? I attended one years ago where you came and everyone loved it. Our Relief Society sisters would love to have you come if you have the time. We were looking at April or May or other months if possible. Thank you Joy!

    Shaunna

    Reply

  120. Kent Nickell
    Jan 28, 2012 @ 08:51:30

    Hi, Joy: I’m in charge of a stake garden. It is approximately two and a half acres in size. We have lost control of it three years in a row. I need help! We plant 15 rows of potatoes 700 feet long. I would like to know if we could spray for weeds on these potatoes and get rid of half the weeding. We plant four types of peppers, tomatoes, zuccinis, pumpkins, cucumbers. Is there anyway that I could meet with you at this site and tell us how to organize this better. The stake garden is in Draper on 12170 South and 700 West. This garden is just to help people who are struggling and need these vegetables. This garden is a service garden. Thank you for your help. Kent Nickell (801) 301-9135

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 07, 2012 @ 09:39:48

      Hi Kent,
      The solution is mulch, mulch, mulch. Layers of wet newspaper, cardboard, grass clippings, etc. In the paths, the idea is the deeper, the better. I would love to come see the garden. Would you email me at askjoy@joyinthegarden.com so we can set a time?

      Reply

  121. Leon Ewell
    Jan 30, 2012 @ 11:33:29

    Hello Joy, Are you still doing consultation landscaping at an individual’s home? If so I would like schedule you.

    Thanks,

    Leon

    Reply

  122. Joanne Asay
    Feb 03, 2012 @ 16:52:03

    Hello Joy,

    I killed 3 blueberry plants last year but I’m going to try again. I know they need acidic soil…so this time I’m going to plant them in containers with purchased soil that is made for them. My question is: should I put the pots in the ground (plastic so they don’t leach) or a ceramic pot above ground? And if they are above ground, can I leave them out during the winter? I would appreciate your advice.

    Thanks you,
    Joanne

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 07, 2012 @ 09:29:36

      This year has been really hard on young plants because of the record dry December. Last year was exceptionally hard on plants because of the rapid drop to below zero in November. Sigh. Not good at all. Scratch the bark to see if there is any green showing. I suspect they haven’t made it.

      Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 07, 2012 @ 09:36:57

      Hi Joanne,
      If the containers are thin plastic, in ground may be best. Sunshine can heat the plastic to the point that any roots touching the sides of the pot will be killed. Heavy, preferably light colored, ceramic would be fine above ground. Remember to give the little bushes acidifying fertilizer every 7-10 days during the growing season. When the shrubs go dormant in the fall, put the containers in an outside, protected area like the north side of your home. The idea is to keep them cool. If we have another dry, dry winter you will need to check every few weeks (when temperatures are above freezing) to see if they need water.

      Reply

  123. Chrystal
    Feb 04, 2012 @ 15:07:40

    Hi Joy, We live in Marmalade and have 2 dwarf evergreen shrubs, about 4 feet tall we transplanted several years ago from a neighbor’s yard. After a rough patch for a year getting over the transplant shock, they were doing well. This fall/winter they both turned almost entirely brown. Any suggestions? Are they dying? Both side by side, on the east side of the house, adjactent to a cement patio w/roof. Thank you, Chrystal

    Reply

  124. Lynn
    Feb 13, 2012 @ 17:06:15

    Hey Joy,
    My friend roasts and grinds his own coffee beans. Would these beans make a good compost item?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 14, 2012 @ 10:16:30

      Coffee grounds make good soil amendments by themselves or added to compost. The only problem I’ve seen is when they are used as a mulch that is more than an inch or so deep. Then they tend to mold.

      Reply

  125. Susan Hanks
    Feb 17, 2012 @ 17:20:51

    When is it safe to plant lettuces, radishes, and other cold veggies?
    I want to plant some pots of herbs. no garden planting. Will that work?
    Where can I find good info on planting herbs?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 20, 2012 @ 09:16:36

      If your garden area was prepared last fall, you can plant those cold hardy veggies as soon as the snow melts and the ground isn’t frozen. Herbs work very well in containers. Is it just container herb planting you are interested in?

      Reply

  126. Catherine
    Feb 19, 2012 @ 13:53:13

    I am planting Irish moss in a section of my yard. Will bulbs (dafodills, tulips, etc.) grow through Irish moss?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 20, 2012 @ 09:18:05

      Bulbs grow up through Irish (and Scottish) moss very well. These ‘mosses’ aren’t actually moss – they a very low growing little flowering groundcovers.

      Reply

  127. Renee
    Mar 03, 2012 @ 09:58:32

    Hi Joy

    A few years ago while driving in my car I heard you tell about a book about a seventh grader in New York City in the 1960’s. Each chapter was titled “September”, “October”, “November”, etc. I checked out the book – read it and loved it. Then I bought it for a friend who was retiring because I thought it seemed a lot like his life. But now I want to buy a copy for myself which I didn’t do at the time and for the life of me I can’t remember the name of it or the author. Can you help me please?

    Thanks – Renee

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 05, 2012 @ 08:49:35

      Hi Renee, I think the book we’re thinking of is called “The Wednesday Wars” by Gary Schmidt.

      Reply

  128. Margo
    Mar 09, 2012 @ 09:28:26

    Joy our yard has those dreaded necrotic rings! Who can best treat my yard to get rid of them?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 13, 2012 @ 15:36:37

      Oh my. There is no good treatment for this horrible lawn problem. Just use the best practices possible: mow long, 2 1/2 to 3 inches; water deeply but less frequently; go easy on the fertilizer.

      Reply

  129. Crystal Harper
    Mar 10, 2012 @ 18:51:23

    I want to plant some fruit trees an apple and peach or pear. Can you tell me what varieties grow best in northern Utah and when should I plant them?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 21, 2012 @ 09:15:02

      Utah State University Extension Office has a list of recommended varieties for our area http://www.extension.edu.usu My personal favorites: for peach – Lemon Elberta for apple – Honeycrisp for pear – Asian pear, variety Shinseki regular pear – Red Bartlett

      Reply

  130. Emily Childers
    Mar 10, 2012 @ 20:18:51

    Joy, this morning on the radio program, 3-10-12, you were talking about a website, http://www.uscd.org, I believe for buying trees, shrubs, etc but having to go to alpine to pick them up. I cannot find this information on your page plus I have tried to find the webpage and nothing is coming up. Any ideas?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 12, 2012 @ 09:03:38

      The website is uacd.org I’ll list it on my webpage today. Sorry for the misdirection.

      Reply

  131. Paul
    Mar 19, 2012 @ 08:35:08

    With this recent freeze in northern Utah, when is the best time to prune my grapevines?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 21, 2012 @ 09:15:38

      Last month!! or as soon as you can get out there.

      Reply

  132. neil flandro
    Apr 04, 2012 @ 18:24:29

    Joy, I have a friend from Bosina who wants to find out what white ( paint?) fruit farmers around Payson put on their fruit trees. What does this do? I have heard it keeps the bores out? He says they do it in his country. Thanks, Neil

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 04, 2012 @ 19:46:05

      It is simply white latex paint, usually thinned with water. Interior or exterior latex will do.

      Reply

  133. Ryker
    Apr 08, 2012 @ 19:10:28

    I recently purchased two raspberry starter plants and forgot about them outside and they froze. Can I still plant them and produce or should I get new ones?

    Reply

  134. Karalee
    Apr 10, 2012 @ 13:12:49

    Hi Joy! My house faces east and I am looking for a good tree to give me some shade in my backyard. (It’s pretty big.) I am toying with either the Double Weeping Cherry, Purple Robe Locust, or the Galaxy Magnolia. Is any of these trees better than another and what would you recommend?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 13, 2012 @ 14:27:15

      Of those choices, I would go with the cherry. Stay away from the Locust. Do you have utility lines to contend with?

      Reply

  135. Liz
    Apr 10, 2012 @ 17:13:31

    We have a huge apple tree. It has grown so big we don’t think we can spray it ourselves anymore. Who would you recommend we use to spray our tree for us? We live in West Jordan, so someone local would be nice as well.

    Reply

  136. Suzanne Housley
    Apr 12, 2012 @ 16:13:56

    Joy,

    Sometime in the first two weeks of May, would you be able to come and speak to our Relief Society? No set evening, just when it’s convenient for you. Please contact with an answer one way or another as soon as possible. My name is Louise Greco but I am having you respond to my friend, Suzanne Housley’s email address or you can call me: Louise’s home number: 801-930-9590 Louise’s cell: 801-580-5117. Thank you so much.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 13, 2012 @ 14:25:39

      My calendar is full for May, but I have openings in June. Would that help?

      Reply

  137. Ron Woodward
    Apr 13, 2012 @ 11:11:50

    Good morning Joy,
    My name is Ron Woodward of West Jordan,
    I have a question: We purchased and had delivered and planted a beautiful (3″) “Fairview Maple” last October from the wonderful folks from Wasatch Shadows. We followed instructions and applied a douse of a “Root Starter” both when it was planted and again about three-four weeks ago, as of today we are not seeing any blossoms as yet and all of the other Maple trees in the area are now in full bloom. There have been for some time very small buds at the ends of most of the branch ends but they don’t appear to be growing or maturing.
    Are these Maples late bloomers? or could there be a problem? Is there any thing yet to be done to help this beautiful tree wake up?
    Have a great day, please reply.
    Ron Woodward

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 13, 2012 @ 14:30:22

      I think it is just a case of mild transplant shock. A tree of that size will take 3 or more years before it puts on much top growth. Just be careful not to over water – a tree uses water in proportion to amount of leaves grown. Just let it ‘wake up’ slowly on its own time schedule. Once we get more consistent warm weather the leaves should unfurl nicely.

      Reply

  138. David
    Apr 18, 2012 @ 15:59:34

    Joy, Thanks for your show. I was wondering if you would be able to tell me what type of plant I am looking at. I took a picture but don’t know how to send it to you. It looks kind of like a cat tail until you get close and realize that it is very spiny. The entire stem is covered with spines as well as the top is all spines. I was told it is a wetlands plan, but it sure doesn’t look like it. Any help would be great. Thanks

    Reply

  139. Kerry Exeter
    Apr 23, 2012 @ 12:00:36

    Joy-
    My neighbor gave me raspberry transplants years ago. She cuts her right down every year which is what I do. Mine though are not producing very well. I have big glorious plants but no fruit. Around the edges of this large raspberry patch is where they seem to produce the best. I have watered them using a sprinkler when they get dry and also an automatic sprinkler is used in the area to water the grass and a portion of the raspberries. My husband thinks I shouldn’t be cutting them back every year because maybe their not the everbearing type. Another opinion given to me was I needed to thin them. What do you think?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2012 @ 08:03:21

      Sounds like the soil may be depleted, and/or not enough water. They need extra water once the fruit starts bearing. Go through and dig/thin/cut the smallest canes, creating paths. At that time you can add compost to the soil. And if they are near the lawn they may be getting too much nitrogen fertilizer, so either go easy on the lawn fertilizer or remove some of the lawn that is nearest the berries.

      Reply

  140. Erinn
    Apr 23, 2012 @ 17:25:33

    Hi Joy,
    We have been house hunting, but really think we will be were we are for most of the summer. We would like to plant a garden to get fresh produce, but we dont want to plant something that is not going to produce untill later in the summer, and not be here. What would you recomend planting for early summer harvest? Or just earlier?
    Thanks,
    Erinn

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2012 @ 08:06:35

      How about concentrating on container planting? That way you could take tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, etc. with you when you move? That includes beets, carrots and green onions as well. Plus anything else you would like to eat, really. In the ground you could do beets, chard, green onions.

      Reply

  141. Paula
    Apr 26, 2012 @ 13:01:48

    Hello, Joy. I wonder if you will give me your opinion about what to do with my flowering cherry tree? I believe it is a Kwanzan cherry, and it is approximately 10 years old. The hard winter of 2011 damaged it severely. Last spring (2011), there were blossoms and leaves on only two of the branches in the front of the tree. We thought it would recover, but it unfortunately looks the same this spring. Is there hope for this tree if we prune it (which would mean cutting off almost all the branches), or should we start over with another tree? Thank you for your time.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2012 @ 08:07:40

      I think it is time for a new tree. Thank it for its years of service, save the wood for walking sticks or firewood and buy a new tree.

      Reply

  142. Elaine
    Apr 27, 2012 @ 11:22:40

    Hello Joy,
    What wood is recommended to be used as a border around a vegetable garden? Iknow railroad ties (which are so commonly used) can leach chemicals in to the soil. Thank you for your input.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2012 @ 08:09:42

      You are right – no fresh railroad ties. Very old ones are fine, since the creosote will have long since leached out. Redwood is often used because it lasts longer before it rots out. I treat the 2 x 10’s that I use with a wood sealer on the inside surfaces before I plant.

      Reply

  143. Darlene Bradley
    Apr 28, 2012 @ 10:01:42

    I have two questions. I have ever bearing strawberries that never produce more that a half dozen, small, misshaped berries. I have put sodium nitrate on them in the past as suggested with no different result. This year I was sold Blooming & Rooting Soluble Plant Food which is Amonium Phosphate, Potassium Phosphate that I was told to put on after the blossoms are on, which I have done. Can I finally expect to get strawberries.

    I have a four foot lilac tree which was a runner that I got from my daughter in Colorado 8 or so years ago. It is growing well and blooms in May with the first blossoms being beautiful and the leaves looking great but the later blossoms a week or so later never quite open up and the leaves by then are jagged on the edges. What is going on?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2012 @ 08:14:01

      1. if the patch is several years old, the plants may be too crowded – there should be 8-12 inches between plants. And they need consistent watering once the berries start to set.
      2. Two problems may be happening: the notching indicates Black Weevil, the adults give the leaves a pinking shear look but the real problem is the larvae which eat at the roots. There is also a possibility of the Lilac/Ash borer doing damage. That pest is emerging now. Your locally owned nursery can help you find the right product for both problems.

      Reply

  144. Emily Jensen
    May 03, 2012 @ 09:15:36

    Joy- We’d love to have a book or two to auction off for the school….
    To Whom It May Concern:

    Summit Elementary is celebrating a monumental 100 years this year! Summit is a public K-5 school of about 600 students, teachers and staff which has served the community and provided excellence in education for 100 years. All alumni and other members of the community are invited to celebrate the evening of May 17, 2012 at Summit on the lawn for entertainment and commemoration events. Teachers, students and many volunteers have been working hard to prepare a night of entertainment honoring the past and welcoming the future. Dances, singing, performances, the traditional May-pole, and a live band will fill the evening with great family fun and memories. In addition, a silent auction will be held to carry the Summit Eagles into the next 100 years. All money from the silent auction will go toward a new computer lab. Their current lab is 15 years old and is in great need of an update. The silent auction will provide wonderful opportunities to get great products and services while benefiting the education of Summit Elementary Students. If interested in contributing to the silent auction, or in some other way for the Summit computer lab, please help in one of three ways:

    1) Cash- any and all cash donations will be accepted and all funds received will go directly to purchasing the new technology.
    2) Product Donations- all product donations will be included in a silent auction to be held at the “100 Year Celebration” of Summit Elementary School on May 17, 2012. Gift baskets, gift certificates, and auction items will gladly be accepted.
    3) Sponsorships- businesses, families, or individuals may sponsor one or more items including, but not limited to, individual iPad 2’s.

    Cash-
    If you would like to donate cash, anything from $1-$100,000, we will apply it directly to the purchase of the new technology. Mail cash/check to Summit Elementary School. Checks should be made payable to “Cache Education Foundation,” or “CEF” with Summit Donation as the memo and mail the check to: Summit Elementary, 80 W. Center, Smithfield, Utah 84335. If desired, you may receive a receipt confirming your tax deductible donation. Please indicate if this is desired.

    Product Donations-
    Students, teachers, and parents have been preparing for the “100 Year Celebration” for the community to commemorate Summit Elementary School on May 17, 2012. Media recognition will be present, and thousands are expected to attend! All product donations will be used at a silent auction to be held at this event. To donate, just bring/ send your item(s) to Summit Elementary any time before the deadline of May 10th. You may also contact Nicole Zollinger at 435-563-1798 or nzollinger@comcast.net to make arrangements for larger or perishable items or if donations need to be picked up at another location. Sponsor name will be displayed that night with the item(s) donated.

    Sponsorships-
    Items needed and available for sponsorship:
    Projector Screen (need 2) $200 donation
    iPad 2 (need 60) $250 donation
    Projector (need 2) $400 donation
    Document Camera (need 2) $600 donation
    Hub Station (need 6) $800 donation
    Power Cart (need 2) $2,600 donation

    To sponsor these technology items, indicate desired item for sponsorship and send CASH or a CHECK payable to “Cache Education Foundation” or “CEF” with “Summit Donation” as the memo. Sponsor name will be inscribed on actual donated product to be used at the school! For business sponsors, please email your logo to: rhondawrightut@yahoo.com
    If receipt confirming tax deductible donation is desired, please indicate.

    We thank you in advance for your time, consideration, and support of our students’ education and future advancement.
    Questions, comments, or for additional information, please contact: Emily Jensen at 435-563-6045 or emily@jensenfam.net ; Nicole Zollinger at 435-563-1798 or nzollinger@comcast.net ; or Jana Barlow at
    435-563-1003.
    Thank you again! Our children appreciate your assistance in their educational success.
    Emily Jensen-Summit Elementary Technology Committee member
    emily@jensenfam.net
    435-563-6045

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 17, 2012 @ 11:31:46

      I sent a reply via email, I’m very sorry about the delay.

      Reply

  145. Mark Legerski
    May 03, 2012 @ 12:33:57

    Does Utah County have any gardens similar to Wasatch Community Gardens.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 17, 2012 @ 11:35:04

      Hi Mark, Contact Emily Sadler or the USU Extension Office in Provo for the best information on Community Gardens Emily Saddler=

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 28, 2012 @ 11:08:02

      I believe they do. Contact Emily Walker Sadler of Garden Masters, Utah County.

      Reply

  146. Lynette
    May 03, 2012 @ 21:03:57

    Hi Joy, crazy question for you. I recently heard (with all of the “gluten free” rage) that old wheat – meaning seeds that have not been genetically modified – might be tolerated by those with issues from modern wheat. I was curious if you knew where one could get their hands on such good, old fashioned seeds. Thoughts?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 17, 2012 @ 11:43:51

      Contact a fellow named Caleb Warnock, Caleb Warnock
      He’ll know.

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 28, 2012 @ 11:09:59

      I’d check with Caleb Warnock, calebwarnock@yahoo.com He is very knowledgeable about such things.

      Reply

  147. Kristen Mendenhall
    May 09, 2012 @ 15:57:11

    I planted some azaleas and really want to defy their reputation. I have clay soil (saratoga springs) but added about 6 in of top soil on it. I read that azaleas roots grow sideways so will they have a chance if their roots don’t hit the clay? I am also wondering if I add acid will it help them survive, and how do I add acid?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 17, 2012 @ 11:46:29

      You are fighting a dauntingly uphill battle. They need acid soil = lots of peat moss or potting soil added to the “top soil”, at least 3 inches. Afternoon shade, acid fertilizing every two weeks with something like MirAcid, then deep (2-3 inches) organic mulch….
      good luck!

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 28, 2012 @ 11:13:21

      Azaleas need very acidic soil, topsoil won’t do. You could try growing an azalea in a large container (14 inches or more wide) filled with good, peat moss based, potting soil. Put the container in the ground to look like it is growing in your soil. Water with acid loving fertilizer every two weeks. These plants also need morning sun and afternoon shade. Good Luck!

      Reply

  148. Jane Banks
    May 11, 2012 @ 14:03:57

    I have a raised bed garden plot I built and planted last year. Filled with new soil last year. For several months last winter, neighbor cats used the plot as a litterbox, until I fenced it off. I want to plant a veggie garden there again. What do I need to do with the soil – replace it? replace some of it? use it?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 17, 2012 @ 11:48:18

      I would try to screen out the solid droppings (like you do in a litter box); add new box mix soil after sifting; for two years only plant above ground veggies, no root crops; wear gloves, preferably plastic, when working that soil.

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 28, 2012 @ 11:16:02

      First, sift out the solid waste, then drench the remaining soil with water. Let it drain and drench again. Then once again. For this year I recommend only planting above ground crops. In fact, I’d wait 2 or 3 years before planting any root crops. Adding good compost or box mix bagged soil would also be a very good idea after you do the leaching process with water.

      Reply

  149. Claudia Packer
    May 15, 2012 @ 09:25:42

    Joy, we just returned from a stay in Argentina for 1 1/2 years and found our Cherry tree almost dead. It’s about 5 to 6 years old and was growing beautifully before we left and was producing cherries, it’s now about 10 to 14 feet tall. Now ALL the new spring leaves have weathered up and are dry and dead, but the twigs themselves are flexible. The bark has many places where it has split, and is black and flaking off. We looked under the bark a little bit and saw some white specks but no bugs. At the base of the tree is a lot of fresh, new, green shoots coming up, they look very healthy. What is wrong with this tree and can I save it?

    My daughter bought one of your signed books for me for Mother’s Day, I love it, there is so much information.
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 28, 2012 @ 11:18:12

      The shoots at the bottom are most likely suckers that are coming from the root stock. The top is dead and won’t recover. I suspect it was drowned. Time for a new tree! After digging the hole, fill the hole with water and make sure there is good drainage in that area.

      Reply

  150. Claudia Cox
    May 26, 2012 @ 13:10:40

    Joy, our relief society is having a garden party in June . Usually the 4th Thursday, and we like to have someone come and talk to us about gardening. Would you be available on that date, and do you do such a thing? We usually meet in someone’s back yard and have a luncheon as well. We would be delighted if this is something you do. Thanks, Claudia. In Lehi.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 28, 2012 @ 11:19:19

      Hi Claudia, Thank you for the invitation but my calendar is full for this year. Perhaps we can connect for next year.

      Reply

      • Claudia Cox
        May 31, 2012 @ 16:57:00

        Do u have a colleague that might be free?

        Reply

      • Claudia cox
        May 31, 2012 @ 17:02:35

        Thanks for your reply. Do u know anyone else that might be interested?

        Reply

  151. Cindy
    May 28, 2012 @ 10:41:26

    We sometimes have worms in our apples. Is it too late to spray this year? If not, what should we use and how often should we spray? Also, is there a trap for the flying critters that are infesting the apples? Thanks, Cindy

    Reply

  152. Shirley Burrows
    May 29, 2012 @ 11:03:28

    I planted swiss chard last year – it was delicious – it has grown back this year, but looks like it is seeding. Should I replace with new seeds?

    Reply

  153. lani
    May 30, 2012 @ 19:13:39

    help, i have leafminers on my spinach and beets. what should i do?

    Reply

  154. Marcia Avila
    May 31, 2012 @ 12:30:44

    Hi Joy, I purchased a green euryops viridis and did okay for a week or so and now the leaves and flowers are all dried up with no sign of new flowerage. So is there anyway to revive this once beautiful plant/trained into a tree plant?
    HELP!

    Reply

  155. Jane Walker
    Jun 13, 2012 @ 14:27:19

    I have a lawn question,Joy. We have a dog and in the places in the yard where she has urinated over the years, the grass is dead and in some places is just dirt. What do I need to do to get the grass to grow there again. Do I need to remove the dirt and haul in more uncontaminated dirt and then plant grass seed, or do I just plant grass seed in the bare spots. Thank you for your help. Jane Walker, Cottonwood Heights.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 02, 2012 @ 09:49:12

      You could try a new product by Humic Green that seems to help. The soil needn’t be removed unless you are planting edibles there. Remove any weeds, ruffle the soil and mix in an inch or so of good compost. Level, tamp lightly and water well. You can seed now but keeping that area moist and the little seedlings watered will be very difficult. I’d wait until the end of August to re-seed.

      Reply

  156. SRK
    Jun 13, 2012 @ 15:46:23

    I won tickets on your radio show on June 2nd and I never received a call and I don’t know where to get the tickets. Will you please let me know.

    Thanks, I am sooooo excited about the garden tour.

    Reply

  157. John Kovary
    Jun 14, 2012 @ 17:58:39

    I am adding several lengths of soaker hoses on my vegetable garden this year. Can you please tell me how long do I have the leave the water on using this method?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 02, 2012 @ 09:46:23

      You will need to inspect the soil after about 15 minutes. Dig down 5 inches or so and see if the water has penetrated that deeply. If so, 15 minutes should do. If not, try another 15 minutes and test again. Keep testing until you get water to soak AT LEAST 5-6 inches down. How often will depend on the wind, temperature, kind of soil, size of plant, type of plant……..

      Reply

  158. cathy
    Jun 18, 2012 @ 11:04:31

    My tomato plants are disappearing right down to a small nub at ground level. ?What should I be looking for? No deer droppings anywhere around. The roots are intact. Help!!!….. and thanks so much.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 02, 2012 @ 09:44:02

      First on the suspect list is a cutworm, next would be slug or snail. Do you see any evidence of a silvery trail around your garden?

      Reply

  159. Lynn
    Jun 19, 2012 @ 18:45:15

    Beautiful last day of spring greetings,

    Help! Something (critter) is eating away at my beans, squash, and cucumber starts. My beans look lacey and my squash and cucumber starts just barely poke their little leaves up and something eats them completely off. I’ve been going out at dark with my trusty flashlight to catch the theives but I’m not seeing anything. Any ideas? Perplexed!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Lynn

    Reply

  160. Malissa
    Jul 02, 2012 @ 14:49:47

    Hello Joy,
    I just bought a couple of semi dwarf early elberta peach trees. I know it’s not the ideal time for planting trees. Am I ok to plant them and just water really well or is it better to store them in a shady place and plant them closer to fall. What additive should I use when I do plant? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 30, 2012 @ 10:59:22

      You can plant anytime you can dig a hole! Mid July through August is stressful for new plantings. If you have a place that gets at least half a day sun, AND you remember to water daily, maybe even twice daily, the trees can stay in their container until end of August. They would do that in the nursery anyway. Some nurseries recommend Root Starter when planting trees – follow label directions. And a $10 tree should get a $50 hole: 2-3 times as wide as the roots and just a little more shallow that where it was planted in the pot.

      Reply

  161. Sally Francis
    Jul 09, 2012 @ 21:49:20

    My potted geraniums on the south side of my house have really small leaves, and the leaves keep going brown. The blooms are small . I have replaced five or six geraniums and need to replace two more. I also have pots with geraniums in my back yard on the north side. They always look gorgeous every year, but they are struggling this year but are doing much better than my ones on the south side. I have heard you shouldn’t fertilize when it is hot, is that true? My husband mixed fertilizer with the soil when we planted them. Is that why I have had to replace so many? I love geraniums, but I am really having problems with them this year. Am I watering too much or too little. I water about every five days when the soil feels dry and fertilize once a week with Miracle Grow. I have check for bugs, but haven’t seen any. I need help, Joy!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 30, 2012 @ 11:06:12

      Geraniums in containers need dilute fertilizer every other week – even if there is slow release in the potting soil. When we water the containers, the fertilizer is flushed through the soil. During these hot, windy days they probably need watering twice a day!
      In the soil geraniums prefer rich soil – have you added compost this year? 2 to 3 inches in the soil is about right. In addition to the compost in the soil, another 2 inches of organic mulch will help moderate the soil temp as well as soil moisture. Those geraniums in the ground should be getting 1/2 strength MiracleGro every two weeks.
      Be sure to check the roots of the geraniums you buy. Gently slide them out of the pot and see if they have become root bound (more roots than soil). If so, gently return them to the container and look for other geraniums.

      Reply

      • Sally Francis
        Aug 01, 2012 @ 11:41:53

        I know the wind has taken a toll on a lot of flowers this year. Especially on the south side. Thanks Joy for your info. I am still confused about watering my geraniums. If the soil is wet, should I still water them twice a day? I have been fertilizing. Next year I will add compost and organic mulch. My soil seemed compact even though I used potting soil. I repoted them with J&J’s Premium Potting Soil. Can I successfully grow geraniums on the south side or is it too hot for them?

        Reply

  162. Esther
    Jul 25, 2012 @ 07:17:34

    Hi Joy, I have a box elder bug infestation. What are some remedies for this preferrable organic but I am willing to take any suggestion.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 30, 2012 @ 11:07:12

      Vacuum cleaner!!! and maybe DE (diatomaceous earth) around window and door sills.

      Reply

  163. Cammie Barrus
    Aug 06, 2012 @ 10:51:23

    Two questions: Why do I have tomatoes getting ripe when they are too small? and My zucchini which was doing very well now has leaves that are wilting and dying off and I can not see any squash bugs I am not sure what is causing this I pretty sure they get enough water.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Aug 29, 2012 @ 12:11:25

      Hi Cammie, I just returned to reply to my website, sorry about the delay. The heat has been pushing some tomatoes to ripen small…by now (the end of August) I hope your tomatoes have been sizing up nicely. As for the zucchini, have you noticed any earwigs or slugs/snails?

      Reply

  164. Lynn
    Aug 10, 2012 @ 20:27:24

    Joy, I planted a couple of Virginia Creeper vines this spring. One is growing quite well, but the leaves at the base of the plant are starting to turn red and curl up. Any ideas what might be causing this? I’ve tried watering more often, then less often, both with no success.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 26, 2012 @ 09:38:31

      As the plant begins to naturally drop its leaves this fall, cut back on the watering. Some plants take longer to establish than others and I wouldn’t worry at all. Next spring, as the leaves begin to grow, you can give them both an application of fertilizer. Let me know if there is a great difference in their growth pattern next spring.

      Reply

  165. Sandy H
    Aug 11, 2012 @ 10:54:28

    I have two questions Joy: (1) I was out of work till recently so I didn’t get a lawn service or take care of it myself. Now I have a lawn with lots of weeds and there all different types of weeds. Help! What can i do this year at this late date? Also, what can I do next year? (2) A friend is considering getting something called an Aerogarden that grows tomatoes and green peppers indoors on her windowsill. It is some type of indoor hydroponic unit. Have you ever heard of it? does it actually work? No soil or potting mix is involved.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Aug 29, 2012 @ 12:40:59

      When temperatures stay below 85 degrees, you can start using selective herbicides for the broadleaf lawn weeds. This fall, apply a winterizer fertilizer (every company makes one – just look for something on the label that says good for late fall into winter application) in October. Remember to mow your lawn as long as your mower will allow until the last mowing of the season when it is good to lower back to about 1 1/2 inches.
      I own one of those ‘hydroponic’ systems and it works very well….but they are quite expensive. I think it works best for leafy plants like salad greens and herbs but you could use it for the smaller bush vegetables as well.

      Reply

  166. Emily
    Aug 13, 2012 @ 08:50:46

    Hi Joy!

    I need your help. We just moved into a new home in Farmington, and we’re needing to cover up an ugly chain link fence. We want to do some kind of hedge around it, but don’t know what would be best. It would need to be able to get tall, and ideally we’d like one that would stay green all year (well at least not lose it’s leaves). It will have one east facing side and one south facing side. If you could give me some tips, it would be greatly appreciated!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 26, 2012 @ 09:40:54

      Do you have at least 5 feet of growing space in front of the fence? You could consider a mixed border: some spring flowering shrubs, some with red, purple or variegated leaves and some evergreen plants. How tall do you want it to grow?

      Reply

  167. Tiffany Sadler
    Aug 14, 2012 @ 11:25:33

    Hi Joy,
    I live in South Jordan and have a question about hydrangeas. I have a beautiful one planted in my backyard. It’s gets probably equal parts sun and shade. The foliage is lovely. Not looking dry at all. However, it is not flowering at all. I have not amended the soil with acid yet this year – could that be the issue or is there something else I should be doing? Any help would be appreciated.
    -Tiffany

    Reply

  168. Mike
    Aug 23, 2012 @ 20:40:57

    I have thousands and thousands of these little bulbs in my yard. I am going to plant a garden next year. Will they be a problem? And how do I get rid of them
    .

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 26, 2012 @ 09:47:15

      They might well be either Grape Hyacinths or Star of Bethlehem. Either one will come up in your garden. I recommend covering your growing beds with permeable weed barrier and planting in that. Cut a “T” or “X” to plant little transplants and a single long slit to grow things like beets or carrots. Prepare your growing beds by adding 2-3 inches of good compost and mixing it with your existing soil, then spread another 2 inches of compost as a mulch. Lay the black weed barrier over the bed and secure the edges by burying 4-5 inches in the soil or use rocks or two by fours. I recommend the beds be as long as you want but only four feet wide. That way you can reach all the plants without stepping on the soil. This method will bless you with a nearly weed free garden. Oh, water will go right through the weed barrier; if you use something like a soaker hose, put it on the soil under the barrier.

      Reply

  169. Lynn Johnson
    Aug 24, 2012 @ 11:02:44

    I am looking for shade trees for the west side of our house. We are taking out some gigantic cottonwoods and want something that will grow well but stop at about 35 feet, plus or minus. A neighbor has a flowering pear that seems nice and has stopped growing at about half the size of the cottonwoods.

    What would you recommend?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 26, 2012 @ 09:48:44

      I would recommend checking out Fruitless Mulberry, Crabapple trees with PERSISTENT FRUIT (no mess) or our native Big Tooth Maple.

      Reply

  170. Debra Little
    Sep 09, 2012 @ 12:06:41

    At one of your presentations you mentioned a product to spray on broadleaf evergreens to hold in moisture during the winter. I lost my notes and hope you will be able to provide that name again. Also, any tips on preparing broadleaf evergreens for the upcoming winter? Thanks so much.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 26, 2012 @ 09:50:38

      It is an anti-dessicant called WiltPruf. The label recommends applying when the temps are around 45 degrees if I remember right. Make sure you water deeply at that time and maybe even once more if we don’t get any precipitation.

      Reply

  171. Judy Darby
    Sep 09, 2012 @ 15:54:20

    I have afides on my cauliflower and my burssels sprout I had NO idea that could happen …someone just asked me tht question the other day and I said NO but low and behold there is was today …. what can I do????

    Reply

  172. Sarah Roper
    Sep 15, 2012 @ 15:19:51

    Hi Joy! I have a question: I have flower beds along the South side of my house that have black weed barrier over them, covered by shredded wood “bark”. It’s the kind that is dyed, and I believe it comes from shredded telephone poles etc. I bought it in bags from Lowe’s. Anyway, I’d like to take up that “bark” and weed barrier in the spring and plant vegetables in that space. Do I need to worry that the chemicals from the dye or shredded treated wood has contaminated the soil along there? Thanks for any help you can give me!

    Reply

  173. dicentra
    Sep 15, 2012 @ 15:53:39

    I have a magnificent patch of Dicentra spectabilis at the northwest corner of my house. There are plenty of trees to the west and south of the patch, so it’s deep shade almost all of the year, except in early spring, before the trees leaf out.

    They’re as happy as clams at high tide, but you know what happens to Dicentras round about July.

    Do you know of an annual or perennial replacement for the Dicentras that would be happy in the same spot, or at least at the northern edge (facing the street)? The bed is heavy clay (I’m just a few blocks away from the WVC Western Garden Center) and heavy shade, and there’s a lot of Ailanthus altissima living nearby to “enrich” the soil. (The Dicentras don’t mind it at all.)

    I’ve tried some Lamium maculatum, but it is too small to hide the dying and missing foliage. I also have tried lily and gladiolus bulbs, but there’s not enough sunlight even at the edge of the bed to keep them alive more than a year at a time.

    Thanks so much!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 28, 2012 @ 09:22:35

      There is a little plant called Corydalis that might be just what you need.

      Reply

      • dicentra
        Sep 28, 2012 @ 19:11:58

        Corydalis lives here? Even when it’s this dry?

        Among more gastropods than you can shake a stick at?

        I love Corydalis! Thanks!

        Reply

  174. terrie
    Sep 26, 2012 @ 17:11:17

    Joy, you gave me a recipe called Lindas marinade for perenial vine weed…I wrote down all the ingredients but neglected to put the amounts…who knows why I do what I do…could you please send this to my e-mail. I am over run with it. Thank you so much

    Reply

    • Joy
      Oct 05, 2012 @ 10:35:28

      I have the recipe on my webpage of the KNRS.com website -click on Weekend Programs and then FAQ.

      Reply

  175. Sterling Smith
    Sep 27, 2012 @ 11:11:25

    Hello Joy!

    I have a Tuscan Olive Bonsai that is struggling. I have had it since May in its original 6 x 4 x 3 ceramic pot. It grew like a weed for the first 3 months but the new branches are still very flimsy and the growth has stopped. The leaves are still very green but are starting to look sickly. I’ve been watering it ever third day.

    Please help me save my office plant!

    Thank you

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 28, 2012 @ 09:23:53

      Sounds like not enough light! Overhead fluorescent lights are not usually sufficient for a bonsai like that.

      Reply

      • Sterling Smith
        Sep 28, 2012 @ 11:56:25

        I’ll take it home and let it get some sun.

        Thank you!

        Reply

  176. Lauren Paret
    Oct 16, 2012 @ 22:53:21

    Hello joy. I am wanting to plant some blackberries and strawberries in my yard. I am not a gardener and do not know a whole lot about it. Where do I start?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Dec 02, 2012 @ 08:20:43

      Hi Lauren,
      Spring is the time to plant! Both do very well here. Check with your local nursery to see what varieties they carry. During this winter’s down time check the usu.edu website for the recommended varieties. I’m growing Caroline raspberries and highly recommend them; as for blackberries, just make sure whatever variety you choose is THORNLESS!

      Reply

  177. Allan Hales
    Oct 20, 2012 @ 11:06:14

    I’m getting my garden ready for winter. I have a lot of clay in Salem, Utah. What can I add that will break up the soil? I heard of using washed sand, U-lite soil, gypsum, and Vermiculite. What would you suggest? The garden area is 50 x 30.

    Reply

  178. Janette Standifird
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 15:17:03

    Question: I am wondering if I can dig up my Dahlias now? This is my first year planting dahlias in my flower bed. I have heard that you should let them freeze before storing for the winter. We have had 2 days where the temperature was below freezing. Let me know! I live in Herriman, Utah.

    Reply

  179. Richard
    Nov 12, 2012 @ 12:26:19

    I live in Bountiful. I have tried growing bell pepper every year now for 4 years and have NEVER had success. The plants do not grow very big and I usually only get 2 or 3 small peppers per plant. I have tried growing them in different parts of the garden, giving them full sun or partial shade. I’ve tried fertilizing, not fertilizing. The first couple of years I only planted 4 plants but last year I tried planting 12. Nothing seems to work or make a difference. Any suggestions?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 24, 2012 @ 12:51:44

      Excellent soil is the biggest factor. Organic matter is the secret here. First, mix in at least 3 inches of good compost. Add tons, and I mean tons, of leaves to the garden spots and leave (no pun intended) them on top of the amended soil. The spot for peppers should have full morning and early afternoon sun but some shade from about 3 pm on. Peppers don’t like cool weather so don’t fudge by putting them out early. Buy very young plants, never with any teeny peppers or flowers already growing. Try to keep the soil moisture even.

      Reply

  180. D. Rich
    Dec 01, 2012 @ 11:36:00

    Joy, got up this morning, sat down with coffee to listen to Joy in the Garden………….Saturday ritual………….and heard male voices spouting mutual fund infor………………where are you????????????
    I looked up knrs site and not a word or schedualing of your show, what happened?????????????

    Reply

    • Joy
      Dec 02, 2012 @ 08:12:07

      KNRS made what Rod Arquette told me was a ‘revenue’ decision. I was asked to come in to talk with him Monday afternoon, and there was told my program had been cancelled thereby not giving me a chance to say farewell to my listeners. That is the way it is ALWAYS done in radio – no notice, no chance to say goodbye. The station sold the air time to those with $$$ to pay for it. Don’t know what will happen next – I will spend Christmas with my little family in Pittsburgh and rethink the rest of my life when I return. But thanks for checking on me!

      Reply

    • Joy
      Dec 03, 2012 @ 12:09:48

      Money spoke and it said give me that air time! So the show is no more. I wasn’t told until Monday so as radio always does, it left no opportunity to say farewell to my listening friends. What happens next is a step into the unknown for me but I won’t take the step until I get back in January. Christmas in Pittsburgh!

      Reply

  181. Carla Salemi
    Dec 01, 2012 @ 16:49:55

    I was shocked to turn on KNRS this morning and hear a financial show instead of yours. I then went to your web site and found out what had happened. I don’t know when you started your garden talk show, but my family and I moved to Utah from Illinois in 1994, and I have been listening nearly every Saturday morning for many years. I learned a lot from you, and have also benefited from your responses to a few email questions. I will miss your wonderful show, including your music selections and hearing about your grandchildren. I enjoyed meeting you at the Sandy Costco when I bought “Joy in Your Garden,” and have learned some helpful vegetable-gardening tips from the book.

    Maybe you and your show will end up on another station some time. I will be checking your web site periodically for the possibility of that happening. However, if you have decided that having Saturday mornings off will be a good thing, I will understand!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Dec 02, 2012 @ 08:16:19

      The radio business never let’s a host say goodbye – I learned of the change Monday afternoon. That was when I was told of a ‘revenue’ decision: they sold the air time to those with sufficient $$$ and my show was no more. After Christmas in Pittsburgh I will reassess what to do with the rest of my life, this being the first day thereof!

      Reply

  182. Dawn Gordon
    Jan 03, 2013 @ 06:50:38

    Joy, My mom and I miss you deeply. Saturday morning is empty and will never be the same.

    Reply

  183. Wayne Parke
    Jan 12, 2013 @ 10:13:16

    I miss the show.

    Will you be on another station? Is a live stream available? Podcast?

    Reply

  184. Sherry Jolley
    Jan 12, 2013 @ 14:34:51

    Hi,
    There seems to be know other way to contact you so I hope you get this message. Our Relief Society would like you to come and speak for our RS Birthday Party on Wedensday April 10, 2013, at 6:30p.m. We are located in Pleasant View by Weber High School. I believe you were here last year to another ward and they said your message was wonderful. Please respond as soon as possible so we can make other arrangements if you are unable to speak. Thanks so much for your time.
    Sherry Jolley cell: 801-710-1125
    RS Presidency

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 09, 2013 @ 13:39:02

      Hi Sherry, would it be OK if I bring a powerpoint presentation? We would need a screen of some sort. I’m glad we connected via phone and email!

      Reply

  185. lorene arnold
    Jan 12, 2013 @ 16:34:38

    joy just loved your show i learned so much and loved hearing about your yard and grandkids looked forward to it each week will surely miss you good luck in where the next road leads..

    Reply

  186. Rachelle
    Jan 29, 2013 @ 10:47:30

    Joy,
    I have a potted plant (I have no idea what kind it is), inside my home. I have had it over two years, it was a plant I received from my grandma’s funeral and it has a lot of sentiment to me. It has always looked good and seemed to be healthy. The last week or so it has shriveled up and is dying quickly. I don’t know what to do. Could it be because the cold? What do I do to revive it? Is there a plant food I could give it to help?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 09, 2013 @ 13:57:50

      Quick demise often points to Spider Mites. Did the leaves go kind of speckled gray-green? Or, did the leaves turn yellow first? Don’t give it plant food (fertilizer) until we see new growth. You could email me at askjoy@joyinthegarden.com for a quicker answer.

      Reply

  187. Richard
    Feb 23, 2013 @ 20:04:26

    OK, so you have a link that says “KLO Radio Show”, but when I click it I get their website and cannot find any mention of you at all. So are we going to get to hear you on the radio again or what?

    Reply

    • Richard
      Feb 23, 2013 @ 20:06:27

      Never mind, then I paid attention and saw the announcement for March 16. Welcome back!

      Reply

  188. Lisa
    Mar 16, 2013 @ 14:10:34

    Hi Joy!

    I am having a garden reception June 29th in my yard. I need to plant some climbers and am wondering which ones would be a good choice. Grow and bloom quickly, in a sunny location. Wedding colors are red, orange, golden yellow, etc – summery!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2013 @ 10:29:32

      You may get blooms from BlackEyed Susan vine, a lovely gold flower sliding toward orange. It is an annual and many of our locally owned nurseries carry them in large containers (5 gallon) You could disguise the pot, or better still, sink pot and all in the ground. As far as planting flowers to bloom then….you could try vining Nasturtiums. I’d check with your nearest local nursery/garden center. They may even be able to order in just what you’re looking for. And now is a great time to go talk with them. Believe me, they are sooooo anxious to talk flowers right now, and have plenty of time to help you.

      Reply

  189. Laura
    Mar 21, 2013 @ 22:36:07

    Question – what vegetables would tolerate overhead watering? I am lucky enough to have permission to grow stuff on the side of our town home complex. I grew a celebrity tomato plant last year and it did great, except 90% of the tomatoes had those awful, brown scars/splits from what I believe was the swelling and splitting from the community sprinklers. So I want to try something else this year, but am not sure what could thrive with the overhead watering. It is a perfect spot for a squash plant, perhaps, but I fear leaf mildew.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2013 @ 10:24:58

      Nearly everything else will be fine. Mildew rarely is a problem here in our desert. Squash plants almost always show Powdery Mildew late in the season but usually doesn’t affect the produce. The tomatoes will almost surely crack when near ripe and water gets on the skin – rain or irrigation. The brown leathery patch on the bottom is from inconsistent water; like wet, very dry, wet, etc.

      Reply

  190. Glenn
    Mar 24, 2013 @ 19:03:03

    Hi Joy
    I am trying to set up a drip system for my vegetable garden and for a long flower bed and would like to know where you think is the best place to get information and supplies for a drip system. Thankyou for any help you can give me.

    Reply

  191. Gessie
    Mar 25, 2013 @ 11:40:35

    Hello Joy, I was looking over your web page and saw that you had some music from a lady named Rhonda Leigh. I worked with a great lady with the same name, in talk radio, back in the early to mid 90s. Do you think this might be the same person? Thanks much! -Gessie

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2013 @ 10:19:05

      Yes, Gessie, this is the same wonderful woman. She passed away about 2 years ago and at that time her family shared the songs with me. Permission was given to share the music any way I wanted and so I’ve been playing them on the radio show every chance I get. If you email me I will send you the download. askjoy@joyinthegarden.com

      Reply

  192. Kim
    Apr 10, 2013 @ 08:37:42

    Hi Joy,

    I planted four english laurel plants last summer and over the winter most of the leaves turned brown. Is this because the winter was so cold? Are they a lost cause (please say no!)? Is there anything I can do to bring them back? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 10, 2013 @ 10:53:12

      Broad leafed evergreens like laurels have some difficulty with our winters. As new plants, these little guys had a double disadvantage. The good news is that it is possible only the old leaves were affected. Check to see if there are little buds starting to swell on the stems right where the old leaves were growing. Laurels are slow to bud out so you may not see anything yet. You can also check by scratching the stems – if you see green, the stems made it through the winter. If you don’t see green, cut off the dead part and check lower on the stem about 4 inches lower. Keep checking until you either find green or you have cut the stem to the ground.

      Reply

  193. Kathleen Fisher
    Apr 14, 2013 @ 20:02:04

    Joy,
    We planted a hedge of evergreen bushes, the deer ate them. Help! We would like hedge that would grow about 10 feet and that deer won’t eat, preferably evergreen. I live in Herriman.
    Thanks, I love your show
    Kathleen

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 12, 2013 @ 09:04:32

      You might try planting one shrub called Tall Hedge. It is a buckthorn (no thorns!) and it might work. I recommend one at first and let it make it through 2 seasons before investing the $$, only to find YOUR deer love them.
      I’m glad you found the show again! When KNRS cancelled, I feared listeners wouldn’t find us on the new station: KLO 1430 and 103.1 It is earlier on Saturdays, 8 am, and only 1 hour but the station manager just scheduled the show for 2 hours next year!!!

      Reply

  194. Angela
    Apr 17, 2013 @ 22:54:43

    Last year you spoke about a product for grass/soil. I think it is called Hemi Green. Did it work as well as you thought it would and where can I find it. I can’t seem to find it at my local IFA. I tried Google-ing it and couldn’t find it.
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 23, 2013 @ 11:54:26

      It’s called Humic Green. I liked it but I like a Miller Product even better! IFA carries this one, I think: Miller’s Fulvic Bloom It’s a great boost to all plants. It comes in a couple of different formulations depending on where you are going to use it.

      Reply

  195. Ali Adams
    Apr 30, 2013 @ 09:55:56

    For years I’ve followed your advice and have plucked the lowest leaves from my tomato plants and have planted them deep in my raised beds. Can you explain why I’m doing this? I was telling a friend about it and my answer, “Because Joy told me to,” didn’t work for her.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 12, 2013 @ 09:00:38

      Just returned from Pittsburgh, sorry for the delayed response. Tomatoes have the unusual ability to form roots all along the buried stem. By pinching off the bottom leaves (they might rot under the soil and cause a disease problem) and burying the stem, it creates a much, much stronger root system. Added bonus: a short tomato plant, 6-8 inches tall, won’t be blown over in gusty winds!

      Reply

  196. Julie
    May 23, 2013 @ 15:35:21

    Hi Joy. I have wild violets growing in my grass. How do you suggest getting rid of them?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 14, 2013 @ 20:42:41

      They are beastly awful to get rid of…most products that work even a little require an applicator license to buy. Try the KSL Greenhouse webpage. I think I remember Larry Sagers once mentioning a product that helps a little.

      Reply

  197. becky
    Jun 01, 2013 @ 15:31:25

    We have a pinion pine tree that started from a pinenut a few years ago, we just threw out the shells and nuts that didn’t look good out our back door (they smell nice). It is too close to the house so we need to move it. It is about 4ft tall, it is less than 1″ diameter. What time of year would be best to move it? Any other tips on moving it.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 14, 2013 @ 20:44:49

      Most shrubs/trees do best if transplanted when dormant so very early spring is best. You could do a little root pruning this fall to help the tree. Get back to me late summer and we’ll go over the process. Also, tie a little ribbon on one side of the tree, say maybe the north side, and then make sure that side faces north after transplanting.

      Reply

  198. Paul Jasperson
    Jun 09, 2013 @ 21:36:46

    Hi Joy! I need your advice! Just getting ready to plant my vegetable starts and my garden dirt needs some help. It’s a clay based soil that compacts really fast. What can I add to the soil that will help fertilize and make my “dirt” into a good garden soil?? The size of my garden is about 20×20. How much and what to add?? Thanks for your comments! Good gardening! Paul

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 14, 2013 @ 20:47:22

      My recommendation for clay soil is about 1 inch of Utelite Soil Conditioner and 3-4 inches of good compost. For a garden that size I also think it’s a good idea to lay out 4 foot wide beds with at least 2 foot paths in between. Then you only amend the soil in the beds. They don’t need to be made of anything – just lower the soil in the paths a bit and toss the soil into the bed area. Then add the soil amendments.

      Reply

  199. Angela
    Jun 25, 2013 @ 10:28:40

    Joy, I have an Austrian pine tree that was planted last spring. Just a little thing from Costco, and I have such high hopes for it. This spring it has come back with the top brown, and as the season has gone by, continues to brown more. Now most of it is brown. We have a new yard and a I am an overly busy mom. So not a lot of time, and no sprinkler or drip system. Just hose watering. I can’t guarantee that it was watered consistently, at times it has been watered to the point of flooding. We also live in Eagle Mountain. That’s a 40/60 gamble with anything we plant. But the Austrian Pine seems to do the best out here as far as pines go. I’ve had good success with my other trees, despite my failings, and lack of resources. Do you think I’m going to have to cut my losses on the tree, or is there something you can suggest to revive it and help it thrive?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 17, 2013 @ 10:59:24

      You are so right about the odds against trees in your neck of the woods. And pending water restrictions won’t help. I think fall planting is going to give you the best chance of success. Less stress, less heat, more consistent moisture – and I know Costco only brings in those little beauties in the spring. But if you get a chance again, try buying them in the spring, keeping them outdoors, planted still in their pots in a shady area and keep them watered until fall (mid to late September) before planting.

      Reply

  200. jodie
    Jul 01, 2013 @ 08:46:05

    Hi Joy. Is it too hot to plant trees? We are just landscaping our yard and have our lawn established and now want to move on to trees and shrubs. I would like to plant 5 Chanticleer Pear, 1 Riverside Spruce, Weeping Norway Spruce, Japanese Maple Red Cutleaf and 4 Marshall Seedless Ash. Is this a good idea in July? Also what do you think about the Marshall Seedless Ash? I can’t find info about this tree as far as hardiness and mess. The only thing I have found is that they are oval and grow fast. I am worried about finding a truly seedless tree. I don’t want little trees popping up everywhere else from messy seed pods blowing around.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jul 17, 2013 @ 11:02:45

      Marshall’s seedless grows well here and is really seedless. I wouldn’t plant now if you can avoid it. You can certainly plant any time the soil isn’t frozen solid, but our July/August is pretty darn stressful on new trees. September would be a kinder, gentler planting time. And, just a thought, male trees don’t drop seeds but they are powerful pollen producers. Do you tend toward ‘hayfever’? Just saying……

      Reply

  201. Jean Hansob
    Aug 07, 2013 @ 13:23:05

    In June I had sod put in my back yard. It was beautiful at first and started growing. I watered it diligently and then I saw brown spots around the edges and thought perhaps I was watering too much and causing a fungus. I cut back on the water but the brown patches still persist and are growing throughout the lawn. What do you think it could be? Any help or ideas would be appreciated.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 03, 2013 @ 11:35:51

      What kind of soil preparation was done before you put down the sod? Have you checked to be sure the soil under the pieces of sod is getting wet down at least 4 inches?

      Reply

  202. jodie
    Aug 08, 2013 @ 07:35:31

    Joy, Thank you so much for your informative response. I can wait until September to plant my trees. Tell me more about your last question. Male trees produce more pollen? Yes, many people in my home have hayfever. So do I put up with the pods dropping or the pollen flying? What do you think and know about Fairview Maple trees?

    Reply

  203. trish
    Aug 14, 2013 @ 12:13:58

    I have spiders and caterpillers on my maple tree and the leaves have turn brown and are very dry and dying what can I do

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 03, 2013 @ 11:33:34

      Are the caterpillars all bunched together in a mass of webs? The spiders do no harm to trees – they are strictly carnivores.

      Reply

  204. Lynn
    Sep 05, 2013 @ 10:06:17

    I’m looking for a small flowering shrub/greenery for the south facing (all day sun) front of my home. Would sit on either side of my garage. No taller than 4 or 5 ft and 3 ft wide. Any suggestions?
    Thanks,
    Lynn

    Reply

  205. fence jersey village tx
    Sep 21, 2013 @ 20:13:21

    My horses chewed down one of many board fence sections. How do you correct it?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 11, 2013 @ 12:15:40

      I think there is a product you can paint on the wood that is yucky to horses – check with Intermountain Farmers Association Country Store; or, maybe your large animal vet can advise you.

      Reply

  206. Kyle
    Oct 20, 2013 @ 16:33:37

    I live in Star Valley, Wyoming where sometimes in the winter it gets down to
    -40 and warms up to -20 for a week at a time. I planted some new fruit trees this spring and I’m wondering the best way to winterize them before the harsh winter sets in? Do I need to wrap the trunk or can you wrap to entire tree? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 11, 2013 @ 12:14:15

      Now is the time to wrap/paint the trunks. Usually from the bottom branches down to soil level, start at the top and wrap downwards. You could also use white LATEX (not oil) paint. Dilute up to 50%. These methods are to keep the bark from warming on a sunny day and then suddenly freezing again when the sun goes down. Love Star Valley, by the way. My friend Judy Call took me to visit her relatives many times in decades way past.

      Reply

  207. Joe Bingham
    Feb 12, 2014 @ 07:51:22

    Joy,
    The Mittlieder Foundation President (James Kennard) (http://growfood.com/about-the-foundation/) is putting on a gardening seminar in South Jordan on March the 29th. Is there anyway that you could help us get the word out? Jim Kennard has been a guest on many radio shows and is willing to do a telephone interview with you on your show if possible. If you will e-mail me I can send you a PDF of the seminar outline and flyer for this event and/or arrange for Jim to contact you.

    As a side note: Jacob Mittlieder (deceased) and Jim Kennard are the ones that originally designed and put in the gardens at Thanksgiving Point.

    A personal note: I have so much enjoyed your shows over the years. You got me interested in the USU Master Gardener program and I am taking the course this year. I hope to graduate in November.

    Thank you so very much for all you do for the gardening community.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 19, 2014 @ 10:14:07

      Hi Joe, first, congratulations on taking the MG course! I would be glad to promote the seminar – my program on KLO starts up again on March 1st. Please send me the information – askjoy@joyinthegarden.com – and we’ll see if I can arrange for an interview of one kind or another with Jim Kennard.

      Reply

  208. Steve Jensen
    Apr 26, 2014 @ 21:53:28

    How do I rid my lawn of ramshorn burrs?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 01, 2014 @ 10:00:30

      I am going to assume that you mean what is sometimes called “Puncture Vine” or “Goathead” It is a vicious little (actually, very large) annual weed that spreads out on the ground and creates hundreds and hundreds of the nasty seed pods. I keep thinking if someone could help me invent something like a lint roller that would be large enough to roll across a lawn, we could make a fortune! One of my listeners wondered if you cut the lawn short and put a piece of carpet nap side down on the surface, if it would pick up the burrs. Never heard back from them so I don’t know if it was ever tried. Since it is an annual plant, you can minimize further growth by being sure to correctly use a pre-emergent weed control every spring….like now.

      Reply

  209. Heidi Clark
    Jun 01, 2014 @ 21:18:27

    I am wondering if I should deadhead my columbine plants. I am wondering if that will help them rebloom, or is it better to let them reseed.
    Thanks!

    Heidi

    Reply

  210. Sally
    Jun 24, 2014 @ 08:34:38

    Our sewer line was missing for a long time and when it was replaced, we got volunteer tomato plants. Are they safe to use?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jun 24, 2014 @ 14:12:52

      I would. Perhaps not root crops….did the sewage actually contaminate the soil?

      Reply

  211. Sally
    Jun 25, 2014 @ 08:09:40

    Yes, raw sewage went into the ground for a year and a half. Digging to replace the sewer line brought all of that dirt up to the surface. Along with the dirt came a lot of tomato seeds which are now plants. I transplanted some of them into clean soil.

    Reply

  212. Joy
    Jun 25, 2014 @ 09:04:44

    Yessiree…..I’d stay far away from root crops in the area and be very, very sure to use gloves in that part of the garden. I would also lay down a 2-3 inch layer of mulch to be sure water doesn’t bounce off the soil and on to the plants. Oh…you moved them to a different area; well then, as I was saying, should be no problem!!

    Reply

  213. susan nelson
    Nov 03, 2015 @ 12:53:55

    Joy, i planted raspberries 3 years ago. this year was the first year that i got berries. am i supposed to cut them back? They seem to be spreading – are they supposed to do this? The berries were not very tasty…. am i doing something wrong? thanks, suisan

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 11, 2016 @ 10:00:29

      Oh boy, do they ever spread! To keep the patch in bounds, once a year use a shovel to dig straight down, deeply, around the edges of the bed. Then pull out all the stems/roots that have crept further than you want them to. Last year was very hard on raspberries, so don’t despair yet. Any cane that had berries, no matter how small, should be cut down to the ground every year. You can do this in the late fall or early spring.

      Reply

  214. Denise
    Feb 10, 2016 @ 13:46:33

    Joy,
    My name is Denise, I have followed you for a long time with all your amazing advice and knowledge in gardening. I am a Relief Society Activity cordinator and I was wondering if you would be interested in coming and spending an evening sharing your tips and knowledge with our group of Relief Society sisters. I’m not sure if you do this kind of thing or not. Would you just contact me back and let me know either way.

    Denise

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 11, 2016 @ 09:50:11

      Hi Denise, I am no longer making presentations like this. I’m 4/5 retired (!) meaning the radio show is the only “work” still on my plate. We start up again on March 15, 8 am, on KLO. If you are in the Salt Lake Valley, try Conservation Garden Park. They used to have very knowledgable people who would give presentations for no charge. Thanks for thinking of me, Joy

      Reply

  215. Denise
    Feb 12, 2016 @ 09:03:57

    Great thank you for getting back to me! Enjoy retirement! Can’t wait for your radio show to start back up. I will for sure call the Conservation Garden Park!

    Reply

  216. Jamie
    Aug 07, 2016 @ 20:57:26

    Hi Joy! Are you still on the radio these days? I used to listen to your show all the time, but then it was suddenly off my station and I was very disappointed. I will switch stations if you’re still on somewhere else.
    I would greatly appreciate it if you would grant me a couple questions: I recently moved to Saratoga Springs and would really like to plant a bigtooth maple in my yard to have some nice red fall color, but the nursery I frequent in Orem advised against it because of the soil challenges out here (mainly salt, high ph and clay). I am just so very tired of looking at all of the usual crabapples and honeylocusts and london plane trees that I think I might go against my better judgement and try it anyway. What do you think of planting bigtooths out here? Is it a death sentence for the tree?
    Also, I’ve noticed that my newly planted and supposedly hardy Crimson Spire Oaks and tatarian maples (along with a good number of the young trees planted around town, actually) start off lovely in spring only to brown and curl around the leaf edges, looking horrible in July, even though they are regularly watered. Do you know what might be causing this, and if the condition will improve as the trees mature? I’ve noticed the ground my newly built house sits on is very hard and compacted, and I am just now getting drip irrigation installed. Prior to that I watered the trees by hand. My nursery has advised me to plant trees with peat moss instead of manure to prevent additional salt problems, so that is how they went in. Thanks so much for responding!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Aug 08, 2016 @ 07:37:25

      My radio program is still on the air, and the new station is 1430 KLO AM, from 8-10 on Saturday mornings. Let’s start at the bottom of your message: when you plant trees, or anything else for that matter, my recommendation is to dig the hole as deep as the rootball but 3 times the width. Fill the hole with water and let it drain. If there is still water in the hole after 12 hours, use a pry bar or garden fork to breakup the soil in the hole. DON’T dig the hole deeper. If that doesn’t allow the water to drain……we’ll deal with that in a minute. Mix good compost with the soil you removed from the hole at about 1 part compost per 4 parts soil.
      Now we’re ready to plant. Remove the plant from its container and check for ‘circling roots’. If the roots are growing round and round, cut the bottom of the rootball in 3 or 4 places and ‘ruffle’ the roots a bit. Place the plant in the hole and fill about half way with the soil mix. Water just a little to settle the soil. Finish filling the hole, and water a little more to settle the soil. If there is a grafted part of the trunk, it should be above grade. Soil should taper from the trunk to a slight depression in the soil around the outside of the root ball area. USU website has good pictures to show proper planting.
      There are good reasons why you don’t see many trees dotting the hills around where you live. The maple you like IS a native tree, but grows best in the foothills and lower canyon areas. The leaves naturally brown around the edges in the heat of the summer – all maples around here do. With poor drainage, the trees can be overwatered even though the leaves seem to be drying. Check the soil moisture down about 6 inches each time before you water. I would try a Big Tooth, myself.
      Both the oak and other maple you mentioned need deep, well drained soil. They are hardy in our climate, but I doubt they are in your location and soil. Again, there is a reason you see a limited variety of trees planted in Saratoga Springs!

      Reply

  217. Jamielyn Herrick
    Sep 04, 2016 @ 16:42:04

    We just bought a house and the previous owners planted a variety of trees. My mom thinks most of them we should get rid of but we want your opinion! There are 2 poplars, ash, aspen and plum. We have heard some of those send up tons of runners everywhere, ash are hard to keep alive and the plum has thorns which we have been told means it’s a runner. We want to keep the maple but can you tell us what we should do about the others? We love the shade from the poplars but if they are just going to mess up ours and everyone’s yard we want to get rid of them. Advice please! 🙂

    Reply

    • Joy
      Sep 04, 2016 @ 19:39:03

      I recommend killing and then cutting down all of the trees you listed. You’ll eliminate most of the suckering problems if you kill the trees first. The method is the same for all the varieties. Using a hatchet or strong knife, make downward cuts through the bark, just barely to the wood. Any where on the trunk is fine; I choose where I can reach easily and below the lowest branches.
      Do this with slightly overlapping cuts so you create sort of a phlange or collar. Then using CONCENTRATED herbicide, either glyphosate (like RoundUp) or a dandelion type weed killer, pour the liquid into the collar and let it soak in. The idea is to get the chemical into the conductive tissue of the tree so it is take into the roots. This is a good time of year to try this because trees are naturally beginning to stop production in the leaves and transfering the sugars to the roots.
      Unless there is some overriding reason for removing the trees this fall, I’d wait to cut them down or pull them out until next spring. That way you can be sure they are dead. Any time you just cut down a tree the roots will begin to send up sprouts ALL over the place, along nearly every root.

      Reply

  218. Jamie
    Jan 24, 2017 @ 17:12:38

    Hi Joy!
    I am wondering about the growth patterns of my newly planted fern bush (chamaebatiaria millefolium). I purchased two last spring from the same garden center, planted them in the same location with the same exposure, and gave them the same soil and water treatment. They both appeared healthy, and were the same size when I planted them. For the first few weeks neither one of them did much, and then suddenly one of them had a growth spurt, nearly doubling its size. It bloomed beautifully about a month later. Just as it was finishing its bloom (and while I was wondering what was wrong with the other) the second one decided to finally double its size and put on an amazing bloom show as well, about a month behind the first. It appears that the first one bloomed a bit earlier than the rest of the desert sweet around my neck of the woods, and I wonder why these plants established at different times? Another curiosity is that the flowers and leaves of the first one turned a bronzy color after blooming, but the flowers only of the second one turned bronze, while the leaves retained their olive green color throughout the winter. I have read that fern bush can be semi evergreen, and so I am wondering why the leaves of one plant turned bronze while the leaves of the other stayed green? I inspected the plant with the bronze leaves several times in the last couple months and the twigs feel firm and flexible- not at all like dry, dead twigs- so I’m assuming the plant is fine. Any ideas about what is going on with these guys? They are planted symmetrically on either side of a walkway that leads to my front door, so I’m hoping that they’re both ok, and that they’ll sync up eventually and start following a similar bloom schedule. Thanks for your input!

    Reply

  219. Richard
    Jul 12, 2017 @ 13:57:21

    Hi Joy. I moved from Bountiful to Clearfield in April of 2016. In Bountiful I grew sweet burpless cucumbers and they were fantastic for juicing. This is the second year in my new home trying to grow the same and the cucumbers look great but have the most horrible after-taste and are very bitter. Is it something in the soil? What do I need to do to get rid of that taste?

    Reply

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