Books

Da new book is HERE!!  Spring of 2012

Front cover for the new book

Ideas, ideas, ideas!!

 

Our new book includes why and how to develop your own edible landscape: ways to foil marauding wildlife, ideas for projects that create lasting memories in your garden, the best steps to save and store seeds, and directions for a practical Funeral Potato Garden!

Enjoy other recipes and ideas as

you read our new book,

and dream of

   your own

Incredible, Edible Landscape!

Order now:

Quantity
Inscription(s) should read:

 

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In March 2010, the adventure began and now continues in gardens everywhere.  Looking for an unique gift for the gardener on your list?                                                    

Here is just the idea to makeyour gift giving complete!!!

Joy and Karen’s book is now available at all local bookstores, Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com and other locations online, and wherever the authors are speaking or making presentations. Two years in the making (then comes the running and the screaming…..), this book connects gardeners with straightforward information to guide them through all seasons of the gardening adventure. Written with humor and love, Joy in YOUR Garden provides direction and encouragement for all who aspire to the honored title of GARDENER.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Incredible Edible Landscape was released  April of 2012!   Our aim for this second book is to encourage gardeners everywhere to choose plants that will provide food for the table.  Trees, shrubs, groundcovers, annuals, perennials – these can all be chosen with the dinner table in mind.  We’ll guide you through the conversion to edible landscaping gradually and supply you with ideas to make the transition fun and do-able.  You’ll be introduced to the “Green Jell-0 Garden”  the “Funeral Potato Garden” and the “Roll Up Your Windows, the Zucchini is Ripe!” Garden and other fun gardens complete with recipes to make tasty dishes from the selected produce.  Ideas for growing, harvesting, stocking the storage pantry, saving seeds and having fun are all included in this colorful little book.  Look for it in bookstores everywhere and order directly from this website.

Beautiful and edible, too!

39 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Kristina Michelson
    Dec 21, 2010 @ 18:05:13

    My mother is interested in buying a copy of your book. Will you let me know how to do this?

    Thank you,
    Kristina Michelson

    Reply

    • Joy
      Dec 21, 2010 @ 22:04:05

      You can purchase the book at local book stores or contact me at my email address, askjoy@joyinthegarden.com to buy an autographed and personalized copy.

      Joy in the Garden

      Reply

  2. Donna Drecksel
    Dec 25, 2010 @ 10:59:15

    Want to buy 2 copies of your book. One for myself and one for my avid gardener son, Burke. Please send details. I do live in the Taylorsville area.
    Thanks so much,
    Donna

    Reply

  3. Marcy Bradshaw
    Feb 26, 2011 @ 10:47:44

    When will you be at the Woods Cross Costco? I’d love to come by and buy your book!
    Thanks,
    Marcy

    Reply

  4. Stephanie Allred
    Mar 17, 2011 @ 15:13:01

    My husband was listening to your show a couple of weeks ago and you had mentioned a soil you like to use in the garden. Could you please send me information on what this product is and where to get it. We live in American Fork.

    I am also wondering about grapes. We have tried grapes 2 years in a row and they keep dying. We follow the directions on planting, but it isn’t working out. I had a neighbor tell me to have our soil tested, vould you send us in the right direction so that we can enjoy grapes this year.

    Thanks,
    Stephanie Allred

    Reply

  5. Joni Longfellow
    Mar 21, 2011 @ 19:35:49

    I have your book and I absolutely LOVE IT!! I plant veggies and flowers and shrubs and trees, but I’m still trying to figure it all out. Your book makes it so much easier for the rookies like me. THANK YOU. Can’t wait for the next one. I’ve learned a lot.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 22, 2011 @ 11:13:26

      We’re so glad you are enjoying the book!
      Hmmmm…..next book? Now you sound like my co-author! I’ve barely recovered from this one.

      Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 22, 2011 @ 11:13:58

      By email, please: askjoy@joyinthegarden.com

      Reply

  6. Colette
    Mar 22, 2011 @ 22:04:25

    I heard just a bit of one of your radio shows where you mentioned we no longer need to till our gardens because it breaks up some micro-organism colony. Can you please elaborate on that. Would you recommended it for a 40′ x 25′ garden or any unraised garden?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2011 @ 14:05:50

      “need to till” and “must till” fit with a typical garden where chemical fertilizers are used. However, with a ‘no-till’ garden plus organic forms of fertilizer, the soil itself begins to grow. Soil is an amalgam of non-living and living organisms that can supply all the nutrition plants need. Recent studies have identified mycorrhizae that live both in and around the tiniest roots of plants. These organisms increase a plant’s ability to absorb nutrients many fold. Hefty additions of good compost and gradual elimination of chemical salt based fertilizers will allow healthy development of a garden’s soil. Whether or not you decide to put away the tiller, I recommend raised bed gardens. Make 4 foot wide beds, separated by 3 foot wide paths. Cover the paths with a weed barrier of some sort and then cover the barrier with anything from pea gravel to wood chips. Now you won’t be stepping on the soil, weeding the paths, or watering the weeds!

      Reply

  7. Robin Pomikala
    Mar 23, 2011 @ 14:41:07

    HI Joy, I just moved to the benches in Tooele and we have lots of deer! What flowers do you suggest for rock gardens and also a fenced in back yard.? I love flowers flowers flowers, but deers do too! Should I wrap the flowers in something so they are protected? Thanks so much

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2011 @ 14:12:21

      The real solution to deer in a garden is either an 8 foot tall fence, or two 5 foot fences, four feet apart. Small cages of chicken wire can work but you may not like the look of flowers in detention. You can try the various repellents, but for every one there is probably a deer that can’t taste it. For spring color, plants loads and loads of daffodils next fall. There are short or tall or yellow or orange or white or double color daffodils and deer won’t eat them. Utah State University has compiled a list of less preferred plants that deer don’t seem to like much….but if they are hungry enough everything looks like a salad to deer.

      Reply

  8. Becca Olsen
    Mar 24, 2011 @ 10:48:01

    Hi, I just purchased your new book. Love it ( : I was wondering how to trim climbing roses though, I never know how much to trim them. Is Lily of the Valley going to take over my tulips if I don’t stop them from spreading? I love to garden and plant flowers. I’m glad there’s someone here in our area to consult on problems. Great job love your show!!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 26, 2011 @ 13:47:30

      Lily of the Valley do spread but i think they are a delightful combination with tulips. The short tulips will be gone by the time the Lilies bloom and late tulips will stand tall above Lily of the Valley. But if you want to corral them, it will take constant vigilance. Dig, don’t try to pull the rambling plants. Then you can share with others or put the extras somewhere else in your garden.

      Reply

  9. Gay Stenquist
    Apr 15, 2011 @ 10:40:20

    Our apricot tree is bleeding sap stuff from the trunk and last year the apricots had a lot of ugly brown spot on them. What should we do to help our apricot tree?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 02, 2011 @ 16:37:06

      I suspect a fungal infection called Coryneum Blight or Shot Hole disease. Treatment is done in the fall just as the leaves have fallen. Check with your local nursery for a copper spray or fungicide for help. Also, USU Extension has a terrific service called the Pest Advisory that you can subscribe to – no charge and they will send you weekly updates on what to look for, what to treat with and when to apply.

      Reply

  10. Debbie
    May 17, 2011 @ 10:45:08

    Joy,
    I love your book. Being a Utah transplant, it is extremely helpful. Thanks so much for all the great info and the fun stories.

    Reply

  11. Susan Wilcox
    May 22, 2011 @ 15:28:19

    I am killing aphids off a very special plant. I have kept it alive from my daughter’s work desk after she died in July of 2009. I seem to have a panicky feeling about this plant whenever it is in peril. I don’t even know what kind it is, but it has grown out of the special pot I put it in and it is 10 times the size it was 2 years ago. Is mild detergent and water, or mild vegetable oil the best remedy still for me to keep this plant growing and get rid of the pesty bugs? It has big verigated leaves (sp?) with light and dark green, and the leaves are pointy. It is sprouting from the roots NEW plants all over the pot. We take care of it as though it WERE my daughter, still living. I hope you can help me preserve this plant!

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 24, 2011 @ 16:45:55

      Hi Susan, I recommend Insecticidal Soap, it is formulated especially for plants. Spray the leaves lightly both top and bottom sides weekly until the pests seem to be gone. Probably aren’t really gone but after that wipe the leaves off with 50/50 milk solution every 10 day to 2 weeks. I use little cotton balls. If you have keep it growing for two years, you are doing all the basic things right! During the growing season, March to October, fertilize every two weeks or so with a half strength houseplant fertilizer. Let me know how it is doing or if you need more information.

      Reply

  12. Jeanne Cross
    May 25, 2011 @ 11:08:47

    Hi Joy, I’m going crazy trying to decide if I can put out my tomatoes yet.
    They are getting pretty big in my little greenhouse and I’m getting pretty impatient. What do you think? I live in West Layton. Thank you.

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 25, 2011 @ 12:19:21

      Put them in but remember to warm the soil first: I dig a hole and fill it with very hot water before planting. Let the soil drain and then plant. We need to keep the roots warm as well as the stems and leaves. I got this tip from my buddy Bart. The wind and sun will probably be more of a problem than the cold. Even a milk jug with the bottom cut out and a rock (for the wind) on top for a couple of days will help. Remember to plant them deeply, with only about 8 inches above ground.

      Reply

    • Joy
      May 31, 2011 @ 09:41:05

      OK, so now put out the tomatoes! First, dig the holes and fill with very warm water. While that is draining, pinch off the bottom leaves until there is just 8 inches or so of the top stem with leaves. Now, plant the tomatoes clear up to the remaining leaves so that several inches of stem are below ground. Little root will grow all along that buried stem, plus the plant is less likely to be battered by the wind.

      Reply

  13. Ann Wilson
    Feb 24, 2012 @ 11:09:19

    Hi Joy,

    Does your new book help others to plant seeds in there homes as well as planting a garden (such as what soil to use, what seeds to plant, how often to water, how to get a wonderful garden, etc) outside? I just got your website off of Good things Utah and look forward to planting a good garden this year…Thank you for your time~~

    Reply

    • Joy
      Feb 29, 2012 @ 13:12:52

      We do talk about starting transplants from seed inside your home. The book is supposed to be released April 10th, God willing and the creek don’t rise (old family saying), but I may be able to answer a few of your questions if you email me: askjoy@joyinthegarden.com

      Reply

  14. J Stoker
    Mar 13, 2012 @ 18:22:41

    When U plant Elephant Ears it said to plant with knobby side up
    does that mean the pointed side goes down?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 21, 2012 @ 09:11:56

      There are several different bulb/root type plants where it is hard to tell up from down. When in doubt, plant them sideways!

      Reply

  15. kent
    Apr 05, 2012 @ 12:30:51

    The dahlias I duf in the fall and stored are now starting to sprout’ What shall I do with them?
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 05, 2012 @ 13:03:31

      It is much too early to plant them outside – but you can use potting soil and put them into containers now, like the one gallon pots that nursery plants come in. Bury the tuber so just a little of the tip of the sprout is showing. Gradually introduce the plant to sunshine. An hour or so on a warm morning, then a couple of hours; after a few days start leaving it out during the day as long as the temperatures don’t fall below 55 degrees. Continue to bring the pots back inside when night temperatures are forecast to be below 45 degrees. The sun will cause the stems and leaves to become strong and then you can plant out side towards the middle of May.

      Reply

  16. maness
    Apr 08, 2012 @ 18:27:30

    I have a question that I hope you can answer for me. I have a very large lawn along with 7 hives of honey bees. I am starting to develop a dandelion problem and need to eliminate them with something that will not harm the bees.

    The dandelions were beginning to go to seed and we picked them in order to give ourselfs another few days. What do yo recommend that we do? Do you have a product that will kill weeds & dandelions permanently without endangering the bees? Is there one commercially available if you don’t?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 13, 2012 @ 14:24:00

      The dandelions are actually of some benefit to your bees – they often provide the earliest pollen, especially if the weather is fickle. Are they becoming a problem in all parts of your lawn?
      If you want to use a chemical control, use a broadleaf weed killer in the evening, after the bees return to the hives. Spray just the center of each plant. For a large area, use a pressure sprayer and add Spreader Sticker to the solution.
      The safest way to remove them is to dig when the soil is moist. DON’T use a weed and feed product on the lawn.

      Reply

  17. srk
    May 02, 2012 @ 11:59:57

    Hi Joy,
    I’m trying to landscape a mound on my side yard and I just don’t know where to start. Should I plant in sections or just put plants where I think they look good. How do the landscapers do it?

    Does the Master Gardener class cover that sort of thing?

    Reply

    • Joy
      May 03, 2012 @ 08:53:05

      Yes, it does but you can attend a specific class for design, which might suit this situation better. Depending on where you live, check out Thanksgiving Point, Ogden Botanical Garden, Utah Central Gardens, Utah Botanical Center, JVWCD Conservation Garden Park, and Wasatch Community Gardens. Many of those classes are free.

      Reply

      • srk
        May 03, 2012 @ 14:45:13

        I’m in Utah County. By any chance are any of those classes in Utah County?

        Reply

    • Joy
      May 08, 2012 @ 11:15:18

      That is covered in the Master Gardener classes, which I wholeheartedly recommend, but you may want to take another class dedicated to just landscape design.

      Reply

  18. Alba
    Jun 05, 2012 @ 07:11:29

    i loved this text from you, helped me a lot. i am really grateful.http://www.plansaude.com

    Reply

  19. Ashley Clark
    Oct 25, 2012 @ 20:33:07

    Hi Joy,
    It was so nice meeting you at the Relief Society activity tonight in Pittsburgh. You have so much knowledge and I am so happy you shared it with us! I just ordered your two books and can’t wait to get my hands on them. Thanks again!
    Ashley

    Reply

  20. Marilyn
    Mar 07, 2013 @ 15:06:50

    Last fall you had an author on your show to talk about harvesting seeds. He wrote a book with a very long title. I can’t remember the whole name of the book but the last part was something like . . . everything the Mormon pioneers new that you need to know. I sure would like to find that book. Would you please e-mail me the name and authors name? Thanks

    Reply

    • Joy
      Mar 11, 2013 @ 11:28:54

      Hi name is Caleb Warnock, the book is Forgotton Skills of the Mormon Pioneers.

      Reply

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