Joy in the Garden for Nov 27, 2010

Previous Next

16 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Josette N
    Sep 29, 2010 @ 21:08:20

    I found this while looking up info on my troubled gardenia plant!!
    Suicidal Gardenia Posted by Joan – CA-10 ) on Tue, Jul 6, 99 at 1:33 Hi y’all, Okay, second time here for this vetchii. Got it 1 1/2 years ago, in 1 gal. pot. It was around 1 1/2-2′ tall. Not too long after I got it, transplanted to a 10″ (or maybe 12) terra cotta pot. Last year it bloomed–however reluctantly. I had it in shade with very late afternoon sun. This spring it looked awful, and has continued to go downhill: yellow leaves (soil damp, so watered less), yellow leaves with green veins (so used Ironite, a few weeks later sprayed foliage with liquid chealated iron), leaves crispy brown on edges (so drenched to get rid of accumulated salts). The buds are one by one getting crispy on the edges, *just* as they looked like they were thinking about opening. (I’ve only got one bud left!) New growth looks pale and frail, so put in more sun. Over the past several months I’ve mulched, given it Miracid, given it Epson salts, watered it with bottled water only, misted it once a day (actually I’m on the coast, so air should have enough moisture). Also tried pruning it a little. Now I’ve moved it back to where it gets only some morning sun. Still, it sulks and continues to decline. There aren’t a lot of leaves yet, and just that one unburned bud. I’ve tried everything I can think of, including begging on bended knee, scowling at it, doing a voo-doo dance and shaking a chicken over it. Can anyone think anything else I can do? Has anyone else had this crisping of the buds and leaves?

    Posted by: ROBERT HUGGINS – 10 ) on Thu, Aug 12, 99 at 14:51 DEAR JOAN, ONLY AN IDIOT WOULD SPEND THAT MUCH TIME AND EFFORT FOR A SIMPLE PLANT!MY FRIENDS RECOMMENDED THAT I TAKE UP GARDENING TO RELAX AND ENJOY NATURE.OVER THE PAST SIX YEARS I BOUGHT EIGHT BEAUTIFUL AND FRAGANT GARDENIAS,MYSTERY,FIRST LOVE AND ETC AND AFTER SIX YEARS THESE SIMPLE PLANTS HAS TAUGHT ME HOW TO RELAX.AFTER SIX YEARS I TAKE FOUR VALUIM AND A HALF A GALLON OF SCOTCH AND STAGGER OUT FOR MY NEXT TRY TO KEEP MY ONE PLANT ALIVE.AFTER 3000 HRS ON THE INTERNET,GARDENING BOOKS AND HELP FROM THREE HUNDRED PROFESSIONAL GROWERS AND FOUR GARDENING CDS.HERE WHAT I HAVE LEARN. THEY LIKE WATER BUT YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE SEMI DRY.THEY LOVED SUN BUT YOU HAVE TO KEEP IN THE SHADE.YOU FEED THEM OFTEN.DISCRIBED AS SOMEWHERE BETWEEN TWO DAYS AND TWO YEARS ONLY ON SUNDAYS WITH A BLUE MOON RISING.THEY LOVED NORTHERN EXPOSURE IF YOU HAVE THEM ON THE SOUTHERN.THEY LOVE ACID AND IRON UNLESS YOU GIVE IT TO THEM.THEY LOVE TO GROW SPIDER MITES,WHICH YOU CANT SEE,AND APHIDS. I HAVE FOUND IF YOU BUY OLDER PLANTS THEY TAKE LONGER TO DIE.MY FRIEND SUGGESTED THAT WHEN ONE OF THE SIMPLE PLANTS WASNT DOING WELL TO MOVE TO THE NORTHERN SUN WHICH A LOT.IT DIED QUICKER.WELL I HAVE TO GO NOW MY FRIENDS IN THE WHITE JACKETS ARE COMING TO PULL ME AWAY FROM MY BELOVED GARDENIA. ITS OKAY I HEAR THEY HAVE A SALE ON GARDENIA IN THE NOVELTY SHOP

    Reply

  2. Corban
    Oct 25, 2010 @ 17:31:27

    Joy,
    I had great success this year with my tomatoes, while all my neighbors struggled. This was my first try, so I am chalking it up to beginner’s luck. But before I discount my efforts completely, I was wondering if you have heard of others having success with a similar soil mix that I used? I used raised beds, 50% compost, and 50% coconut coir. Very fluffy stuff. I planted the tomatoes on a 1′ grid pattern, and trained them up a taught string by pinching off the suckers.

    Since my garden is in the front yard on the park strip right next to the road, I had a lot of people stop by and ask questions. Every time they stopped by, they commented about how many tomatoes I had, while their plants were not so productive. (I also had lots of other stuff too, but the tomatoes always garnered the most attention.)

    So, should I credit myself for doing something right, or should I thank my lucky stars and hope for more good things next year?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 01, 2010 @ 11:36:27

      Many a gardener would envy your produce this year. It was not an especially good year, and double especially for tomatoes. So pat yourself on the gardening shoulder – well done! I’ve wondered about using coir instead of peat moss in box gardens, it such a renewable resource. Good to know it can be done. Some of the credit may go to good watering and a good soil-less mix but it’s always good to keep the Lucky Stars happy, so thank them too.

      Reply

  3. Clynn Mann
    Nov 15, 2010 @ 21:12:42

    I have a question. We live in So. Jordan. Heavy clay soil. The home is new. Built late last summer. Can we landscape now or should we wait for spring? We worry about the soil settling and poorer choice on plants.

    Thanks for your reply.

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 16, 2010 @ 13:10:11

      Hi!
      I recommend spending this winter planning your garden. The only thing that would give you a head start would be to bring a load of compost (not top soil) and spread it over your planting areas. It will begin improving your soil over the winter. The problem here is that without a plan you may not know what will be planting beds/lawn areas! You could still invest in a big load of the organic matter and just spread it around a little anyway and then consolidate it next growing season. Since it is a new home you probably have a scale drawing of your plot and house. Invest in a tablet of tracing paper and you can get started on the plan. Very first step is to make two lists: #1 everything you want and need in your yard. #2 all the stuff you don’t want or need! Get detailed with the lists – you can pare down and eliminate later. Stay in touch and I’d be glad to give pointers.

      Reply

  4. Jan Gates
    Nov 27, 2010 @ 10:18:50

    Helpme, call me web challenged; but I have searched your website for a way to purchase a gift certificate for my daughter to have a consultation this spring. Where do I go?

    Reply

    • Joy
      Nov 30, 2010 @ 11:14:52

      Contact me via email for all the details: askjoy@joyinthegarden.

      Reply

  5. Owen M.
    Dec 15, 2010 @ 12:28:41

    I just sent an email – I cant find on the web page where to order the book for my wife for Christmas.
    also the ‘askjoy@joyinthegarden – needs a dot com on the end – or what ever – dot com, dot net, dot org, etc.
    Thanks

    Reply

  6. sally
    Dec 29, 2010 @ 11:40:22

    Hi Joy, saw you on Good Things Utah this morning with your home grown lemon. I have a Dwarf Eureka Lemon Tree that was just recently absolutely covered in blossoms, which most have dropped off and look to be small lemons coming on. My tree has fruit flies (I assume).
    Any idea how I can get ride of the flies and still have lemons? The tree has south exposure in patio door window, I water about every 10 days, and feed it Miracle Grow Organic Choice about every 4-6 weeks. Any help you can give me would be great! Thanks!

    Reply

    • Joy
      Jan 07, 2011 @ 08:07:47

      There is an explanation of how to treat Fungus Gnats, most probably that’s what the bothersome ‘flies’ are, on my web-page on the KNRS website. Click on Radio Show on my website and it will link you over.

      Reply

    • Nadine
      Feb 08, 2012 @ 19:00:25

      it shuold be a warmer winter, at least in S. Fla., so maybe you won't need to worry about the frost this season.–Penny

      Reply

  7. Peggy
    Apr 09, 2011 @ 23:24:43

    I have lots of pine needles from big overgrown trees around the farm. I also have lots of hay at my disposal for use in the garden. Are pine needles good to spread around as mulch in a garden? And if I spread them “lasagna style” with the hay, which should I layer first? I also have the chicken coop hay to spread around and lots of horse manure. I’m thinking of trying a “no-till” method and wonder what you would recommend with what I have on hand. Thanks, Peggy

    Reply

    • Joy
      Apr 19, 2011 @ 10:08:51

      Long pine needles and short spruce needles can be used as a mulch – but to work in them as a growing medium is a painful proposition! They decay at such a slow rate that it is like poking at a porcupine, but they certainly can be used as a mulch on the surface. Chicken coop hay and the horse manure would make fine ‘layers’ to work a lasagna style garden. If you have the book or some reference for the lasagna garden, follow the depth of layers and putting the horse manure as the first layer on the ground might help to keep the seeds in the manure from sprouting. I would put at least 2 inches of good compost on the top layer to start planting in. I’m really in favor of the no-till method in what ever way you choose to try it. Just add layers with the top layer always being good compost before you start layering again. I’d love to hear how it works out.

      Reply

  8. L. D. Stanger
    Apr 20, 2011 @ 17:47:36

    Joy, I need your help. I have a three year old Globe Willow Tree in my yard. This year it is wet and foaming at a point five feet off of the ground at the crotch. Is this a problem and if so what should I do? Thanks for your help.

    Reply

  9. JOY
    Dec 31, 2012 @ 16:45:17

    How sad that you are no longer on the air. I was so disappointed when I went to listen to you a couple of weeks ago. I called the station and asked but they just gave me a none reply. I was not much of a gardner but learned a lot about things I didn’t know by listening to you. The station should be ashamed of themselves. Your program was much more informative that the financial program. Those programs are a dime a dozen on the air. Are you going to be on any other station. I miss your program!!!!!!!!

    Reply

  10. Beverly Beal
    Apr 27, 2013 @ 12:08:13

    I found flower seeds, etc. at Dollar Store on 47th South near 3600 West. Thought this might help as you are visiting so many groups of people and giving your demonstrations. You are a great example and you bring so many people to your discussions. Thank you for all you do.
    Bev Beal

    Reply

Leave a Reply